School & District Management From Our Research Center

How the Pandemic Is Shaping K-12 Education (in Charts)

By Kevin Bushweller & Sterling C. Lloyd — April 01, 2021 1 min read
Eric DiVito gives breathing instructions as he teaches a remote music class at the Osborn School on Oct. 6, 2020, in Rye, N.Y.
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To truly understand the story of how schools have handled the most disruptive period in the history of modern education and what that means for the future of K-12 teaching and learning, you need to look at the data.

During the pandemic, the EdWeek Research Center began conducting twice-monthly and then monthly surveys of educators, and the results told stories of diminishing student engagement and learning loss evolving into huge concerns, accompanied by rising levels of student absenteeism; declining teacher morale sweeping schools across the country; and rising frustration and exhaustion as schools experimented with a wide array of remote and hybrid learning models.

But some of the most fascinating stories from the EdWeek Research Center data over the past year are actually predictive ones. Nearly 9 of every 10 educators surveyed said the objective of ensuring all students have the technology necessary to do schoolwork from home will likely continue after the pandemic ends. And nearly 7 of 10 said offering a wider array of remote learning options for students will also likely persist.

But challenges are ahead. The data also provide a narrative of a generation of students who are increasingly worried about their futures. Educators now must help them see and pursue brighter days ahead.

The following charts from the EdWeek Research Center offer both a look back and a look ahead at how the pandemic is shaping K-12 education more than anyone might have imagined before it took hold in March 2020.

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