School & District Management

Displaced Students Enrolled in New Charter Schools

By Catherine Gewertz — September 21, 2004 2 min read

Thousands of California students were suddenly left without classrooms when the company that operated their charter schools closed last month. But a new report shows that most of the students who were of regular school age have moved to other charter schools.

The California Charter Schools Association, a nonprofit group that advises and advocates for the state’s 537 charter schools, released the report last week. The association collected data from the charter schools that enrolled the students displaced from the approximately 60 campuses of the failed California Charter Academy.

It obtained cca’s enrollment figures from the California Department of Education, which is investigating the charter-management organization. The state reports that cca enrolled 5,495 students in 2003-04, but 40 percent were adults. Of the remaining 3,300 students, 80 percent, or 2,646, are now enrolled in 19 charter schools, said Gary L. Larson, a spokesman for the Los Angeles-based association.

Cca had counted its enrollment as about 11,000, but it got that figure by including all students who had attended at some point in 2003-04, said Keith Edmonds, a consultant with the California education department’s charter school division. The department’s method of counting, which looks at enrollment on a given day, put the figure at 5,495, he said.

Education Week had cited an enrollment of “some 10,000" in reporting on cca’s failure. (“Calif. Charter Failure Affects 10,000 Students,” Sept. 1, 2004.)

The 5-year-old California Charter Academy, an organization based in Victorville, Calif., closed some of its schools in July and the rest in August, in the face of questions from the state about its business practices.

Changing Rules

The state charter association did not track how many cca students enrolled in noncharter public schools. Officials from the charter-management organization could not be reached for comment.

The organization had operated many of its campuses as satellites, outside the geographic boundaries of the three school districts that authorized the charters.

It also enrolled a large portion of students older than 18.

But California law or regulations that went into effect within the last two years were phasing out both practices, Mr. Edmonds said.

Most of CCA’s campuses are closed, Mr. Edmonds said. But some have been absorbed by existing charter schools, and two have become independent charter schools by obtaining authorization from the school districts in which they are located, he said.

Events

School & District Management Live Event EdWeek Leadership Symposium
Education Week's Premier Leadership Event for K12 School & District Leaders.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Holistic Approach to Social-Emotional Learning
Register to learn about the components and benefits of holistically implemented SEL.
Content provided by Committee for Children
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Principals Can Support Student Well-Being During COVID
Join this webinar for tips on how to support and prioritize student health and well-being during COVID.
Content provided by Unruly Studios

EdWeek Top School Jobs

President and CEO
Alexandria, Virginia
National Association of State Boards of Education
Interdisciplinary STEAM Specialist
Smyrna, Georgia
St. Benedict's Episcopal School
Interdisciplinary STEAM Specialist
Smyrna, Georgia
St. Benedict's Episcopal School
Arizona School Data Analyst - (AZVA)
Arizona, United States
K12 Inc.

Read Next

School & District Management New York City's Equity-Minded Schools Chief Resigns
Richard A. Carranza, the chancellor of the New York City schools, announced Feb. 26 he will step down from the job next month.
4 min read
Richard Carranza, Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, arrives to Public School 188 The Island School as students arrive for in-person classes, on, Sept. 29, 2020, in the Manhattan borough of New York.
Richard A. Carranza announced he will depart the top New York City schools job in March.
John Minchillo/AP
School & District Management Opinion New Resource Tracks School System Reopening
The Return to Learn Tracker identifies the current instructional model of all regular public school districts with three or more schools.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School & District Management San Francisco School Board Pauses Renaming 44 Schools, Promises to Consult Historians
The renaming of 44 schools in the San Francisco Unified School District is apparently being put on hold after intense blowback.
Greg Keraghosian
1 min read
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.<br/><br/>
Jeff Chiu/AP
School & District Management Superintendent Who Led During COVID-19 School Shutdowns Gets Top Honors
Michelle Reid of Washington state's Northshore district, one of the very first to close schools last March, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
3 min read
Michelle Reid, superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington
Michelle Reid, the superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
courtesy of AASA, the School Superintendents Association