Recruitment & Retention

Creating a Collaborative Culture

April 09, 2010 1 min read
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A recent survey of educators published by MetLife Inc. finds that teachers working in highly collaborative schools are more likely to be satisfied with their careers and more likely to agree that their colleagues contribute to their success in the classroom. But how do schools become highly collaborative?

The study offers the following recommendations based on a strategy session with educators, principals, and other leaders:

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• create a safe environment for risk taking;

• have a clear strategy and vision of the goals for collaboration;

• provide a strong orientation for new teachers about the expectations for collaboration;

• select strong teacher leaders; and

• provide specific training on how to achieve collaboration.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 12, 2010 edition of Teacher PD Sourcebook

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