School Climate & Safety News in Brief

Comcast Extends Service For Low-Income Families

By McClatchy-Tribune — March 11, 2014 1 min read
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Comcast Corp., facing federal and state government reviews of its proposed $45.2 billion deal for Time Warner Cable Inc., said last week that it would indefinitely continue a $9.95-a-month Internet service for low-income families with schoolchildren.

The company agreed to offer the discounted service as a public-interest benefit and a condition of its acquisition of NBCUniversal in 2011. The program was set to expire this June.

If the Time Warner Cable deal is approved, Comcast’s discounted Internet program will be available in Time Warner Cable areas and 19 of the nation’s 20 largest metropolitan markets, Comcast officials said.

A version of this article appeared in the March 12, 2014 edition of Education Week as Comcast Extends Service For Low-Income Families

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