School Climate & Safety News in Brief

Boston Student Killed in Marathon Bombing

By Bryan Toporek — April 23, 2013 1 min read

An 8-year-old boy was one of the three victims confirmed dead from the explosions that rocked the Boston Marathon on April 15.

Two separate explosions tore through the area near the marathon’s finish line just before 3 p.m. Of the more than 180 injured from the two blasts, at least eight were children, according to media reports.

Martin Richard, the boy who was among the fatalities, was “rushed from the scene” moments after the bombing, rescue officials told the Boston Herald. He was a 3rd grader at the Neighborhood House Charter School in the city’s Dorchester neighborhood.

Boston schools were closed on race day in recognition of Patriot’s Day, the state holiday commemorating the first battles of the American Revolution. The district had its spring recess already scheduled for last week, which means public schools weren’t expected to reopen until April 22.

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A version of this article appeared in the April 24, 2013 edition of Education Week as Boston Student Killed In Marathon Bombing

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