November 29, 2017

Education Week, Vol. 37, Issue 14
Superintendent Steve Bradshaw started sleeping with a shotgun following a disturbing hacking incident involving his district in Columbia Falls, Mont.
Superintendent Steve Bradshaw started sleeping with a shotgun following a disturbing hacking incident involving his district in Columbia Falls, Mont.
Lauren Grabelle for Education Week
School & District Management Schools Struggle to Keep Pace With Hackings, Other Cyber Threats
New survey data show K-12 technology leaders have been slow to identify and respond to cybersecurity challenges, resulting in problems nationwide.
Benjamin Herold, November 28, 2017
10 min read
Early Childhood New Analyses Boost Claims of Lasting Benefits From Pre-K
A pair of recent studies reinforce the value of high-quality preschool, suggesting that future research may pivot toward just why such programs are effective.
Christina A. Samuels, November 28, 2017
5 min read
School choice remains a central part of the policy message from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, but in recent appearances she also has emphasized the need for learning pathways beyond the usual post-high school route.
School choice remains a central part of the policy message from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, but in recent appearances she also has emphasized the need for learning pathways beyond the usual post-high school route.
Nati Harnik/AP-File
College & Workforce Readiness Betsy DeVos Sounds Off on Workforce Readiness, Alternatives to College
Though school choice remains a central part of the education secretary's policy message, she has used recent appearances to emphasize the need for learning beyond the usual post-high school route.
Alyson Klein, November 28, 2017
3 min read
Jim Blew The nominee for a top policy advisory spot is a strong school choice advocate.
<b>Jim Blew</b><br> The nominee for a top policy advisory spot is a strong school choice advocate.
Special Education Democrats Grill Ed. Dept. Nominees on School Choice Priorities
A Senate confirmation hearing for two top positions in the Education Department gave opponents of the Trump administration's K-12 policy a chance to make their rhetorical case.
Alyson Klein, November 28, 2017
3 min read
President Donald Trump walks with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, after meeting with House Republicans on Capitol Hill before the House approved its version of a federal tax overhaul.
President Donald Trump walks with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, after meeting with House Republicans on Capitol Hill before the House approved its version of a federal tax overhaul.
Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Federal Motion in Congress on Tax Plans With Effects on K-12
House and Senate proposals differ on changes to the federal tax code that could affect out-of-pocket teacher expenses, school choice, and even federal funding.
Andrew Ujifusa, November 28, 2017
5 min read
Reading & Literacy From Our Research Center How Mixed-Gender Classes Might Help Boys Read Better
A 33-nation study finds that boys tend to score higher in reading when 60 percent or more of their classmates are girls.
Sarah D. Sparks, November 28, 2017
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
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Standards Commentary What the Standards-Based Movement Got Wrong
Three simple questions could modernize classroom instruction and correct the past mistakes of the standards movement, writes educator Jenny Froehle.
Jenny Froehle, November 28, 2017
4 min read
School & District Management Which Large Districts Have Grown the Most Since 1988?
The Education Week Research Center looked at school districts with 20,000 students or more as of the 2014-15 school year and ranked how much they’ve each grown since 1987-88.
November 28, 2017
The Nest, a common area at Discovery Elementary School in Arlington, Va., was conceptualized, designed and built by students.
The Nest, a common area at Discovery Elementary School in Arlington, Va., was conceptualized, designed and built by students.
Paula Ospina/Education Week
School Climate & Safety Showcasing Creativity in School Construction
In some communities, new designs for schools support the academic goals of educators—and push the boundaries of traditional K-12 architecture.
Michelle R. Davis, November 28, 2017
5 min read
Karin Bloss, a special education teacher at Discovery Elementary School, in Arlington, Va., catches up on work between periods. Discovery is known as a “green school,” with a design premium on energy efficiency and environmental factors.
Karin Bloss, a special education teacher at Discovery Elementary School, in Arlington, Va., catches up on work between periods. Discovery is known as a “green school,” with a design premium on energy efficiency and environmental factors.
Swikar Patel/Education Week
School Climate & Safety School Facilities Form a Foundation for Learning
Debate over the nation's schools often focuses on the abstract and academic, but planning, building, and maintaining 21st century facilities can prove crucial to student achievement.
The Editors, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Education Funding Bond Market Offers 'Green' Option for Building Eco-Friendly Schools
A growing segment of the municipal-bond market serves communities hoping to leverage the promise of energy efficiency and environmental responsibility to finance big-ticket projects.
Robin L. Flanigan, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Solar panels can be seen from classroom windows at Discovery Elementary School in Arlington, Va.
Solar panels can be seen from classroom windows at Discovery Elementary School in Arlington, Va.
Swikar Patel/Education Week
School Climate & Safety Energy Efficiency Is Built Into the Mission at 'Green Schools'
Innovative designs aim to save money, protect the environment, and boost student performance and health. But there’s a lot to consider in making such schools truly sustainable.
Robin L. Flanigan, November 28, 2017
9 min read
Lockers are already installed at Memorial High School in Frisco, Texas, due to be finished by fall of 2018. The building is part of an effort by the once-tiny community to keep up with explosive enrollment growth.
Lockers are already installed at Memorial High School in Frisco, Texas, due to be finished by fall of 2018. The building is part of an effort by the once-tiny community to keep up with explosive enrollment growth.
Brandon Thibodeaux for Education Week
School & District Management School Planners Face Daunting Task in Matching Facilities, Enrollment
Predicting and preparing for growth and deciding where to site schools forces officials to take the long view—and to expect the unexpected.
Denisa R. Superville, November 28, 2017
10 min read
School buildings come with a hefty price tag, especially in an era when innovative features are baked in. Summit Technology Academy, co-located on a satellite campus of the University of Central Missouri, cost $30 million and was designed with career training in mind.
School buildings come with a hefty price tag, especially in an era when innovative features are baked in. Summit Technology Academy, co-located on a satellite campus of the University of Central Missouri, cost $30 million and was designed with career training in mind.
Jim Barcus for Education Week
School & District Management High Costs, Wary Taxpayers Make School Projects a Hard Sell
Against a backdrop of tight local budgets and competing priorities, local officials get creative in seeking community support for the capital financing they need for school facilities.
Daarel Burnette II, November 28, 2017
8 min read
Special Education Letter to the Editor Inclusion Helps All Students
To the Editor:
On Nov. 3, 2017, the On Special Education blog published "Does Inclusion Slow Down General Education Classrooms?" The post, which covers a recently released survey of teachers, presents a complex picture that goes beyond inclusion, but conveys an underlying tone that inclusion has a negative effect on general education students. The National Down Syndrome Society, of which I am the president and CEO, maintains that inclusive education for students with Down syndrome benefits all students, not only those with Down syndrome.
November 28, 2017
1 min read
Education Letter to the Editor Ed. Dept. Pick Is Selectively Opposed to Big Government
To the Editor:
I appreciated the profile of retired U.S. Army brigadier general and former South Carolina schools superintendent Mick Zais ("A Polarizing Pick for Education Department's No. 2 Slot," Nov. 1, 2017). But does Zais actually believe in a "smaller footprint for the federal government" in K-12 education, as the article suggests?
November 28, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management News in Brief Transition
Johnny Collett, the director of special education outcomes for the Council of Chief State School Officers, has been tapped to be the U.S. assistant secretary of education for special education and rehabilitative services.
November 28, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management Report Roundup College and Career Readiness
Preparing students for the workforce isn't the most important purpose of higher education, according to a survey of the trustees that lead the country's colleges and universities.
Catherine Gewertz, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Special Education Report Roundup Special Education
Self-regulated strategy development has the potential to help students with some learning disabilities improve their writing skills, according to a research review by the federal What Works Clearinghouse.
Sarah D. Sparks, November 28, 2017
1 min read
School & District Management Report Roundup Social-Emotional Learning
School leaders see students' social and emotional development as important factors in school success, but in a nationally representative survey of principals, just 35 percent of respondents said their school was fully implementing social-emotional learning into policies and classroom work.
Evie Blad, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Families & the Community Report Roundup Early-Childhood Education
Families may be less likely to take advantage of early-childhood education programs if they work nonstandard hours, finds a new report from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families.
Marva Hinton, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Assessment Report Roundup English Language Learners
Designating early-elementary students who are close to being proficient in English as English-language learners can have "significant and positive effects on [their] academic achievement," a new study concludes.
Corey Mitchell, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief Democrats Decry Plan to Drop Content on Civil Rights Leaders From Exam
The New Mexico education department has proposed changes to state history exams that Democratic lawmakers are decrying as an attempt to erase social-justice and civil rights leaders, among other topics, from lessons.
Tribune News Service, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief Transgender Athletes May Now Compete in Line With Gender Identity in New Jersey
Transgender high school athletes in New Jersey no longer have to prove their gender identity.
The Associated Press, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief Foundations Give $50 Million to Better Early-Childhood Education in Detroit
The Michigan-based philanthropies the W.K. Kellogg and Kresge Foundations are each donating $25 million to improve early-childhood education in Detroit.
Marva Hinton, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Special Education News in Brief Texas Special Ed. Enrollment Surges After Change in State Policy
Special education programs in Texas have seen a sharp increase in enrollment after a policy that directed districts to limit such services was lifted.
The Associated Press, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief Washington State High Court Keeps Legislature in Contempt Over Aid
Although state lawmakers have made progress in a multiyear effort to fully fund basic education, the Washington Supreme Court has ruled that they are not on track to meet next year's deadline and will remain in contempt of court.
The Associated Press, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief S.C. Supreme Court Dismisses Lawsuit Alleging Inequity in School Funding
After 24 years of court battles, a landmark school equity lawsuit aimed at improving education opportunities in South Carolina's poorest, rural schools has been dismissed.
Tribune News Service, November 28, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Teacher Salaries, Experience Down Since Wis. Curbed Collective Bargaining
Teachers in Wisconsin are earning less money and exiting the profession at higher rates than they were before the state restricted unions' collective-bargaining rights, concludes a study from the Center for American Progress.
Liana Loewus, November 28, 2017
1 min read