October 11, 2017

Education Week, Vol. 37, Issue 08
BRIC ARCHIVE
Michael Glenwood for Education Week
Ed-Tech Policy Commentary 10 Disruptions That Will Revolutionize Education
Artificial intelligence, learning avatars, and other innovations will be game-changers for education in the coming years, writes researcher Peter W. Cookson Jr.
Peter W. Cookson Jr., October 10, 2017
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
Curriculum Commentary Civics Education Shouldn't Put Students to Sleep
Strengthening our democracy requires students understand some basic facts about government, including how it works, argue two civics-education advocates.
Scott Warren & Andrew Wilkes, October 10, 2017
3 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
School Climate & Safety Commentary 5 Things to Consider Before Posting Cops in Schools
School resource officers can be an asset to communities, but only with the right training, writes educator John Rosiak.
John Rosiak, October 10, 2017
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
School Climate & Safety Commentary Why This Juvenile-Court Judge Worries About School Resource Officers
Overreacting to student misbehavior can aggravate matters and even push students to drop out, notes Steven C. Teske.
Steven C. Teske, October 10, 2017
4 min read
Student Well-Being Budget Tangles Ensnare Key Early-Childhood Programs
Congress let the popular Children's Health Insurance Program and a home-visiting program expire at the end of the fiscal year and faces bipartisan pressure to fund them.
5 min read
President Donald Trump speaks to, from left, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. The recent debt-ceiling deal saw Trump and Democratic leaders on the same side of a contentious issue.
President Donald Trump speaks to, from left, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. The recent debt-ceiling deal saw Trump and Democratic leaders on the same side of a contentious issue.
Evan Vucci/AP
School & District Management Could Democrats, Trump Team Up on K-12 Issues?
The recent unexpected deal between congressional Democrats and President Donald Trump on the federal debt ceiling raises the tantalizing question of what education policy areas might offer common ground.
Andrew Ujifusa, October 10, 2017
6 min read
Law & Courts Ruling Sends Kansas Back to Square One on K-12 Funding
The ruling striking down the state's school aid formula reignites years of fighting over how to assure an 'adequate' and 'equitable' public education.
Daarel Burnette II, October 10, 2017
3 min read
IsaBella Johnson, 5, makes the base of a pirate ship during her free choice activity time at Pleasant Grove Elementary School in Heflin, Ala. Entry assessments for kindergartners helped the school adjust instruction, including the incorporation of more time for play and developing social skills.
IsaBella Johnson, 5, makes the base of a pirate ship during her free choice activity time at Pleasant Grove Elementary School in Heflin, Ala. Entry assessments for kindergartners helped the school adjust instruction, including the incorporation of more time for play and developing social skills.
Tamika Moore for Education Week
Early Childhood Kindergarten Assessments Begin to Shape Instruction
Schools are looking for ways they can use the kindergarten entry tools to tailor classroom practices with children's academic, social, and physical development needs in mind.
Christina A. Samuels, October 10, 2017
6 min read
Classroom Technology Hacked Twitter Accounts a New Headache for Schools
Recent incidents represent a convergence of issues that are increasingly bedeviling K-12 systems: inappropriate social media use and cybersecurity threats.
Benjamin Herold, October 10, 2017
6 min read
Tim Kelly
Tim Kelly
Education News in Brief Transitions
President Donald Trump recently tapped three men for top posts at the U.S. Department of Education.
October 10, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Shootings Claim Educators' Lives
The deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history occurred last week when a gunman opened fire at an outdoor country-music festival in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring hundreds of others. At least eight who died were educators or school-based personnel.
Madeline Will, October 10, 2017
2 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup Graduation Rates
The high school dropout rate among Hispanic students is at an all-time low, says a new study by the Pew Research Center.
Catherine Gewertz, October 10, 2017
1 min read
English-Language Learners Report Roundup Language Learning
Bilingual people may be better equipped to learn new languages than those who only speak one language, finds a study in the journal Bilingualism: Language and Cognition.
Corey Mitchell, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Classroom Technology Report Roundup Social-Emotional Development
Friendship is valuable to teenagers online and off, finds to a new review of studies of teenagers' virtual social interactions.
Sarah Schwartz, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession Report Roundup Teachers' Perspectives
Nine out of 10 math and English/language arts teachers say having state standards is good for classroom instruction, according to a survey released last week by the RAND Corp.
Liana Loewus, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity Report Roundup Early Education
Preschools attended by low-income and minority children provide on average less free-choice and high-quality curricula than those attended by higher-income and white peers, concludes a study out late last month in the American Educational Research Journal.
Holly Kurtz, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Education News in Brief Authorities Probing Possible Tainting of Flutes Given to California Districts
State and federal officials are investigating how batches of plastic flutes believed to be contaminated with semen were distributed in the spring to schools in Southern California.
Tribune News Service, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief Calif. Panel Adopts History Texts With LGBT-Inclusive Themes
California has moved a step closer to approving a set of social studies textbooks in grades K-8 that includes discussion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals.
Stephen Sawchuk, October 10, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Delaware Loosens Zero-Tolerance Policy Involving Most Weapons in Schools
Local schools boards in Delaware have been given more discretion in how to handle incidents involving students bringing weapons other than guns to school.
The Associated Press, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Lion's Share of Ohio Districts Rank No Teachers as 'Ineffective'
About 94 percent of Ohio school districts did not rate a single teacher as "ineffective," the lowest rating on the state's four-rung teacher-evaluation scale, according to the 2016-17 state report card.
Tribune News Service, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Lawmakers Relax Requirements for Teaching in Illinois Schools
Illinois lawmakers and officials have in recent years eliminated some key requirements would-be teachers needed to get licensed, allowing applicants to bypass some coursework and exams before heading straight to the classroom, a Chicago Tribune analysis has found.
Tribune News Service, October 10, 2017
1 min read
School Climate & Safety News in Brief Seizures of Weapons in N.Y.C. Schools Increase by Nearly Half, Police Say
The number of weapons seized in New York City schools has risen nearly 50 percent so far this year, the city's police department said last week.
Tribune News Service, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Classroom Technology News in Brief First Online Charter School in Indiana to Close After Years of Failing Grades
Indiana's first full-time online charter school will shut down at the end of the school year—a rare occurrence for an online charter even with continually failing grades.
Arianna Prothero, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Law & Courts News in Brief Appeals Court Strikes Down Rules for Speakers at Board Meetings
A federal appeals court last week struck down a Georgia district's policy limiting public input at its board meetings, ruling that the policy gave "unbridled discretion" to the superintendent in a way that could lead to censorship of potential critics.
Mark Walsh, October 10, 2017
1 min read
Protesters confront U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, below, at her speech at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. DeVos did not interrupt her speech to address the protesters, but later took pointed questions from the audience.
Protesters confront U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, below, at her speech at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. DeVos did not interrupt her speech to address the protesters, but later took pointed questions from the audience.
Maria Danilova/AP
Federal Betsy DeVos Finds 'Bully Pulpit' No Easy Perch
Controversy and protests surrounding U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos often threaten to drown out the policy message she’s trying to deliver.
Alyson Klein, October 9, 2017
8 min read
An entrance to Marathon Middle High School in the central Florida Keys is choked with debris caused by Hurricane Irma. The school reopened on Sept. 27.
An entrance to Marathon Middle High School in the central Florida Keys is choked with debris caused by Hurricane Irma. The school reopened on Sept. 27.
Jesus Aranguren/AP Images for Education Week
School Climate & Safety Storm Recovery Remains Painful as Texas, Florida Schools Reopen
Educators in Florida and Texas still face a heavy lift as students and staff return to schools in communities devastated by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.
Marva Hinton & Corey Mitchell, October 8, 2017
7 min read
Katherine Pavie's first grade class at Madison Elementary School in Woodford, Va., participates in a read-a-long to Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat," Tuesday, March 3, 2015.
Katherine Pavie's first grade class at Madison Elementary School in Woodford, Va., participates in a read-a-long to Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat," on March 3, 2015.
Dave Ellis/The Free Lance-Star via AP
Reading & Literacy Is 'The Cat in the Hat' Racist?
A spat over first lady Melania Trump’s donation of Dr. Seuss books to schools points up the existence of culturally insensitive images in many well-loved children’s classics.
Stephen Sawchuk, October 4, 2017
6 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act No State Will Measure Social-Emotional Learning Under ESSA. Will That Slow Its Momentum?
States heeded cautions from advocates and researchers that measures of students' social-emotional skills for school accountability would be unreliable and unusable.
Evie Blad, October 4, 2017
6 min read