April 11, 2018

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 26
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In the unfortunate club of principals and K-12 administrators whose schools become the site of unthinkable violence, the best source of guidance to navigate the grief, trauma, and leadership challenges that follow are their peers who've been through it.
A suburban Minneapolis high school is partnering with more than 200 businesses to reshape its classes and help students find a career that excites them—whether or not it leads to a bachelor's degree.
Fifty years after the death of Martin Luther King Jr., experts say the complicated legacy of the civil rights leader is often reduced in school curricula to just one speech, if not four words: “I have a dream.”
Activists hope to ride momentum from labor activism in states like Arizona and Oklahoma to legislative and even gubernatorial victories that will help break GOP dominance in statehouses.
In a rare interview, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer reminisces about his father’s four decades as legal counsel to the San Francisco Unified School District.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
An analysis of studies on learning mindsets suggests that praising students for effort, rather than for being smart, can backfire in middle and high school.
Federal data show that U.S. public schools have gotten safer in recent years even as public perception may suggest otherwise.
The Volunteer State is the first to test a professional development effort aimed at enabling teachers to find academic potential in students who don’t fit stereotypes about giftedness.
An analysis finds that, in most states, students must exceed high school diploma requirements in order to be admitted to a public, four-year college in their state.
K-12 districts and education organizations are taking a closer look at how they use Facebook in the wake of its high-profile data-privacy scandal.
Congress approved a spending bill for fiscal 2018 that boosts the Education Department’s budget to the largest number in its history, despite President Donald Trump’s proposal for a cutback.
Opponents say changes intended to make the complaint process more efficient may end up scuttling some complaints that have merit.
At the heart of the debate is why black students are disciplined at higher rates and the role of federal officials in addressing disparities.
As the Trump administration considers repealing school disciplinary guidance, the heads of two Obama-era offices of civil rights fire back.
Creativity is too often the domain of the elite. Schools can help, write composer Anthony Brandt and neuroscientist David Eagleman.
Letters
To improve student safety, districts can learn lessons from schools who have successfully stopped acts of violence, write three school-safety experts.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 04/12/2018)

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