November 29, 2017

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 14
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The first review of revised academic standards in 24 states finds that, even with the changes, most states are maintaining key features of the Common Core State Standards.
Those overseeing state education departments cope with staff and budget pressures even as they welcome new flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
New survey data show K-12 technology leaders have been slow to identify and respond to cybersecurity challenges, resulting in problems nationwide.
The cascade of sexual harassment and assault allegations against high-profile men in politics and entertainment has raised concerns across industries, including in education.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
David Cox, the superintendent in western Maryland's Allegany County, says his schools need more resources—such as behavioral specialists—to help support students whose families are impacted by opioids.
A 33-nation study finds that boys tend to score higher in reading when 60 percent or more of their classmates are girls.
Even before there was a federal education department, there was a federal education statistics agency. The National Center for Education Statistics turns 150 this year and a look at its studies over those years shows just how much American schooling has grown and changed.
A pair of recent studies reinforce the value of high-quality preschool, suggesting that future research may pivot toward just why such programs are effective.
This special report is all about school buildings and what it takes to assure that the nation's schoolchildren have a modern, fully-equipped, well-maintained school to attend.
House and Senate proposals differ on changes to the federal tax code that could affect out-of-pocket teacher expenses, school choice, and even federal funding.
A Senate confirmation hearing for two top positions in the Education Department gave opponents of the Trump administration's K-12 policy a chance to make their rhetorical case.
Though school choice remains a central part of the education secretary's policy message, she has used recent appearances to emphasize the need for learning beyond the usual post-high school route.
Three simple questions could modernize classroom instruction and correct the past mistakes of the standards movement, writes educator Jenny Froehle.
For one computer science teacher, a summer internship in corporate America offered valuable lessons for classroom instruction.
Letters
Schools should teach students self-defense and empowerment strategies to decrease sexual violence, writes nonprofit founder Lee Paiva.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the CME Group Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 10/20/2017)

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