Education

Students in Predominantly Minority Schools

August 08, 2001 1 min read

American schools became increasingly more segregated in the 1990s, a rise that a researcher attributes to white flight to suburban areas, federal courts’ ending the strong desegregation plans of the 1960s, and the fact that Hispanic students were not included in desegregation efforts.

50-100% Minority Blacks Latinos

90-100% Minority
Blacks Latinos

1968-69 76.6 54.8 64.3 23.1
1972-73 63.6 56.6 38.7 23.3
1980-81 62.9 68.1 33.2 28.8
1986-87 63.3 71.5 32.5 32.2
1991-92 66.0 73.4 33.9 34.0
1994-95 67.1 74.0 33.6 34.8
1996-97 68.8 74.8 35.0 35.4
1998-99 70.2 75.6 36.5 36.6

SOURCE: Harvard Civil Rights Project, “Schools More Separated: Consequences of a Decade of Resegregation,” 2001.

A version of this article appeared in the August 08, 2001 edition of Education Week as Students in Predominantly Minority Schools