Reading & Literacy

Spellings: Could ‘Reading First’ Make Her a Millionaire?

July 03, 2008 1 min read
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Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings loves Reading First. She says educators do, too. Here’s what she told Greg Toppo of USA Today:

If I had a nickel for every person who said, 'Thank God for Reading First,' I'd be a millionaire."

Let’s do the math on that. At 20 nickels to a dollar, that would mean 20 million people would be singing the program’s praises for Spellings to become a millionaire.

The program is 6 1/2 years old. That’s 2,373 days.

To get a million dollars, every day, 8,428 people would have told Spellings about Reading First’s greatness.That works out to almost 6 people every minute of every day since January 2002.

Although lots of people love Reading First, the secretary wouldn’t get rich in the “nickel for every person” formula. I bet she’d do a lot better on her favorite game show.

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A version of this news article first appeared in the NCLB: Act II blog.

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