Opinion
Education Letter to the Editor

Why NASSP Supports Common Standards

June 19, 2012 1 min read

To the Editor:

As a member of the National Association of Secondary School Principals’ board of directors and a current principal, I want to clarify NASSP’s position on President Barack Obama’s proposal to tie Title I funding to college- and career-ready standards, as reported in “Standards, Title I Link Scrutinized” (March 3, 2010).

While there are concerns about this potential development, it is important to note that NASSP strongly supports common standards. NASSP Executive Director Gerald N. Tirozzi’s full statement on the proposal can be found on the association’s Web site (www.principals.org), and begins: “NASSP applauds the Obama administration’s encouragement for states to adopt college- and career-ready standards, as our organization has long been a proponent of high academic standards for all students and is an endorsing partner in the development of the Common Core.” I join in that support.

These standards, built from the best state standards in the country, are needed to measure the acquisition of requisite learning in a rigorous, authentic, and coherent fashion. Common-core standards should be embraced as a way to prepare a new generation of knowledgeable and creative citizens who can effectively lead and collaborate in the emerging global economy.

My school, a comprehensive career and technical high school, provides students with a rigorous college-preparatory academic curriculum as well as industry-standard licensure programs in career and technical education. Common standards that are based on research and aligned with college and work expectations will help me ensure that the young people who graduate are prepared for higher education or employment. Having consistent standards that states share will better equip students to compete with their global counterparts.

Beverly J. Hutton

Assistant Principal

Burlington County Institute of Technology Westampton Campus

Westampton, N.J.

A version of this article appeared in the March 17, 2010 edition of Education Week as Why NASSP Supports Common Standards

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