Opinion
Education Letter to the Editor

To Aid Science, Instruct More Than an Elite Few

April 11, 2006 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

To the Editor:

I both applaud and weep in response to Nancy S. Grasmick’s Commentary on the National Academies’ committee on science, engineering, and public policy and its 2005 report, “Rising Above the Gathering Storm” (“A ‘New Model’ for a New World,” March 15, 2006). I applaud the continued, high-profile focus on science education. I weep as the nature of the problem is misunderstood by those poised to make a difference. While I would welcome many of the report’s proposed changes, outlined by Ms. Grasmick in her essay, none of these solutions will bring about lasting change in the approach to science education in the United States.

To create the political will for such change over time, we must educate our future citizens and consumers. The general populace, through buying and voting, has the ultimate power—the power of the purse—over scientific research and ethical, sustainable technological innovation. Seeking to further grow the scientific elite will have no impact on the continuous health of such research and innovation.

If we are to advance science in the service of humanity, we must take on the burden of educating all students in the fundamental principles of science. This cannot be accomplished through programs such as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate, which are designed for select students.

We must develop inquiry- and experience-based science programs that provide not only the formulas of science, but also the underlying principles and concepts. If there is no exploration, inquiry, and discovery in a program, there will be no true understanding for students of the importance of the activities of science.

The end result of public science education must be full access for all students to the life of an informed citizen and steward of the world.

Bill Wilmot

Hull, Mass.

A version of this article appeared in the April 12, 2006 edition of Education Week as To Aid Science, Instruct More Than an Elite Few

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
Future of the First Amendment: Exploring Trends in High School Students’ Views of Free Speech
Learn how educators are navigating student free speech issues and addressing controversial topics like gender and race in the classroom.
Content provided by The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Real-World Problem Solving: How Invention Education Drives Student Learning
Hear from student inventors and K-12 teachers about how invention education enhances learning, opens minds, and preps students for the future.
Content provided by The Lemelson Foundation

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: June 8, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: June 1, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: May 11, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: April 27, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read