Opinion
Education Letter to the Editor

‘The New, Improved Educational Machine’ Strikes a Chord

January 09, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

To the Editor:

“The New, Improved Educational Machine” (Commentary, Dec. 13, 2006) is a breath of fresh air. Peter W. Cookson Jr.’s observations are the sensible and respectful comments of someone who offers the reader (and Washington, if it is listening) a glimmer of hope in what has become a featureless landscape of testing and controlling.

The American workforce has been the envy of the world precisely because our nation’s education system has served a diverse population, using no single instructional paradigm, no single set of test results, no cut-and-dried formula for educational success.

Dean Cookson has the right idea. Let us join him in pushing back the Washington hacks who want to make political capital on the backs of our nation’s children.

America would be better served if Washington turned its attentions to leveling the socioeconomic playing field and implementing school reforms that foster the growth of free, creative minds capable of original thinking. Doing anything less is a waste of our greatest natural resource: our children.

Sylvia Blake

Associate Provost

Long Island University

Westchester Graduate Campus

Purchase, N.Y.

To the Editor:

Peter W. Cookson Jr. sends a message in his Commentary that our politicians and school leaders need to pay attention to. I have been trying to send this message for almost 50 years with some success, but it’s not enough.

Are we at last ready to understand that the “educational machine” is inside of us—in motivation and effort, perseverance, and creativity—and not outside of us in machines or even in laws? I sincerely want to believe that we are ready to come to this major understanding, and to support what it takes to improve our students’ internal educational machines.

Dorothy Rich

Founder/President

Home and School Institute

Washington, D.C.

A version of this article appeared in the January 10, 2007 edition of Education Week as ‘The New, Improved Educational Machine’ Strikes a Chord

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Strategies for Improving Student Outcomes with Teacher-Student Relationships
Explore strategies for strengthening teacher-student relationships and hear how districts are putting these methods into practice to support positive student outcomes.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Transform Teaching and Learning with AI
Increase productivity and support innovative teaching with AI in the classroom.
Content provided by Promethean
Curriculum Webinar Computer Science Education Movement Gathers Momentum. How Should Schools React?
Discover how schools can expand opportunities for students to study computer science education.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: September 21, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: September 7, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: August 31, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: August 24, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read