Education

Grants

February 01, 2001 6 min read
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Following are application deadlines for grants and fellowships available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

February 20 NASA
The National Science Teachers Association seeks applications from K-12 educators of science, mathematics, technology, or geography to participate in a two-week workshop at one of NASA’s centers. Twelve participants observe state- of-the-art research and development, create interdisciplinary and team-teaching strategies, share teaching experiences and ideas with other participants, and learn new ways to implement national standards. NASA provides travel, housing, and meals for participants; graduate credit is also available. Teachers must be U.S. citizens, certified to teach in either a public or private school, and have at least three years of teaching experience. Contact: NSTA, 1840 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201-3000; (703) 312-9391; www.nsta.org/programs or education.nasa.gov/new.

February 25 DISTINGUISHED EDUCATORS
The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship program offers teachers staff positions at various federal agencies or congressional offices in Washington, D.C.-including the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health-for up to one year. Einstein fellows receive a monthly stipend of $4,500 as well as travel and moving expenses. Applicants are judged on excellence in math, science, and technology; innovation; professional growth and leadership; communication skills; and knowledge of national, state, and local policies that affect education. Eligible teachers must be U.S. citizens, have a minimum of five years’ teaching experience, and be currently employed as full-time public or private school teachers of science, mathematics, or technology. Applicants must be recommended by a current school administrator and two others. Contact: Peter Faletra, (202) 586-6549; e-mail peter.faletra@science.doe.gov; www.scied.science.doe.gov.

March 1 AMERICAN HISTORY
The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation awards fellowships for graduate study of the U.S. Constitution. Outstanding high school teachers of American history, American government, and social studies are eligible, as are college seniors and graduate students planning teaching careers in those subjects. The foundation selects one fellow from each state to receive up to $24,000 to help pay for graduate study leading to a master’s degree in history, political science, or education. Both full- and part-time fellowships are available. Contact: James Madison Fellowship Program, P.O. Box 4030, 2201 N. Dodge St., Iowa City, IA 52243-4030; (800) 525-6928; www.jamesmadison.com.

*March 1 EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
The Foundation for Exceptional Children offers a small grant to encourage innovative programs for gifted students or students with disabilities. Proposals for the $500 award must be for education-related projects designed to provide services to children with disabilities and/or gifted children, parents of disabled children, or unemployed disabled youths. Contact: Mini-Grant Committee, Foundation for Exceptional Children, 1110 N. Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA 22201; www.cec.sped.org.

March 1 FIELD RESEARCH
The Earthwatch Teacher Fellowship offers educators opportunities to participate in two-week expeditions throughout the world during the summer. The program is sponsored by more than 40 corporations and administered by Earthwatch, a nonprofit group supporting scientific field research worldwide. Volunteers work side by side with expedition researchers and live in the field. Research is multidisciplinary, from archeology to marine biology, so all full-time K-12 teachers are eligible. Counselors and administrators may also apply. Fellows are eligible for funding to cover part or all of the expenses. Contact: Phoebe Congalton, Education Awards Manager, Earthwatch Institute, Clock Tower Pl., P.O. Box 75, Maynard, MA 01754-0075; (800) 776-0188, ext. 118; e-mail pcongalton@earthwatch.org; www.earthwatch.org.

*March 15 CURRICULUM
Curriculum Associates, a publisher of educational materials, announces several grants for outstanding K-8 teachers. Grants are awarded for proposals that effectively make use of teaching tools such as technology and print. Three educators each receive $1,000 plus a $500 gift certificate for Curriculum Associates materials. Contact: Grant Program Committee Chair, Curriculum Associates Inc., 153 Rangeway Rd., P.O. Box 2001, North Billerica, MA 01862- 0901; (800) 225-0248; www.curriculumassociates.com.

*March 15 GEOGRAPHY
The National Geographic Society Education Foundation offers approximately 30 grants of up to $1,250 each to support innovative geography education. Applicants must have graduated from summer geography institutes held by the National Geographic Society or a state geographic alliance. Grants are awarded based on whether proposed projects support the implementation of the national and state geography standards, involve teachers and students in hands-on work and field experiences, stimulate community awareness and participation, and encourage teachers’ professional development. For more information, contact: Christopher Shearer, Program Officer, National Geographic Society Education Foundation, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-4688; (202) 857-7000; www.nationalgeographic.com/f oundation.

*March 15 INNOVATION
The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, an extension of the National Education Association, announces its Innovation Grant program to promote educational endeavors leading to student achievement of high standards. The foundation annually awards up to 200 grants of $2,000 each to teams of two or more educators. Preference is given to applicants who serve economically disadvantaged and/or underserved students, as well as to members of the NEA. Grants may be used for resource materials, supplies, equipment, transportation, software, and professional fees. For more information, contact: National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, 1201 16th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3207; (202) 822-7840; e-mail lkothari@nea.org; www.nfie.org.

*March 16 CABLE TELEVISION
C-SPAN, the cable-television network that covers Congress, seeks applicants for its Middle and High School Teacher Fellowship Program. The selected fellow works at C-SPAN in Washington, D.C., for four weeks in the summer to develop high school print, video, and online materials for the network. The fellow receives a $5,500 stipend, $500 in coupons for C-SPAN materials, and $500 for round-trip airfare and travel expenses. For more information, contact: C-SPAN Middle and High School Teacher Fellowship Program, C-SPAN, Education Relations, 400 North Capitol St. N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 523-7586; www.c-span.org/classroom.

*March 21 GEOGRAPHY
The National Council for the Social Studies and the George F. Cram Company Inc. offer the Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy. Individuals as well as groups working in school districts, public institutions, or universities may submit a proposal for a program aimed at integrating the study of geography into social studies curricula. The winning individual or team receives $2,500, a commemorative gift, and national recognition. For more information, contact: Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy, National Council for the Social Studies, 3501 Newark St. N.W., Washington, DC 20016; (202) 966-7840; e- mail information@ncss.org; www.ncss.org/awards/home.html.

—Kate Ryan

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