Education

For Your Students

September 01, 2003 4 min read
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Following are application dates for student contests, scholarships, and internships. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

*Early Fall GOVERNMENT

The United States Senate Youth Program, funded by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, selects 104 high school juniors and seniors for a trip to Washington, D.C., to study the branches of national government. Each winner also receives a $5,000 college scholarship. The selection process varies by state and may include a test, interview, and/or nomination. Two winners from each state, the District of Columbia, and the Department of Defense schools overseas are selected for the weeklong trip, February 28-March 6. Application deadlines vary by state. For more information, contact: Hearst Foundation, (800) 841-7048; e-mail ussyp@hearstfdn.org; www.ussenateyouth.org.

*Early Fall SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

The FIRST LEGO League, sponsored by the LEGO Group and FIRST, a nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring students in math, science, and technology, invites 9- to 14-year-olds to participate in its annual team tournaments. Groups of seven to 10 students and an adult coach have approximately eight weeks to build, program, and test a fully autonomous robot capable of completing various “missions.” A $150 team registration fee is required by Sept. 30. Teams can enter local events or state tournaments where they are rewarded for excellence in teamwork, problem-solving, creativity, design, strategy, and leadership. At FLL state tournaments, every participant receives a medal, and judges present 13 team honors, including the prestigious Director’s Award. For more information about how to start a team, contact: FIRST, (800) 871-8326; e-mail fll@usfirst.org; www.usfirst.org.

*September 24 ATHLETICS

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award, sponsored by Wendy’s International and the National Association of Secondary School Principals, recognizes students who best represent the nation’s top high school citizen-scholar-athletes. Educators may nominate young leaders from their senior classes; 1,020 state finalists and 102 state winners will be selected by ACT Inc. Twelve students will be selected as national finalists and will receive a trip to New York City for the Heisman Awards Ceremony, where one male and one female finalist will each be named a Heisman National Award winner and recognized in a televised ceremony. Nomination packets may be requested on the Web site. For more information, contact: Wendy’s International, (800) 244-5161; fax (614) 760-2090; www.wendyshighschoolheisman.com .

*October 1 ART

The National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts announces its Arts Recognition and Talent Search Program, open to high school seniors or 17- and 18-year-old artists. The foundation selects up to 125 students, who travel to Miami for workshops and auditions; receive hotel accommodations, meals, and transportation; and get cash awards ranging from $100 to $3,000. Up to 20 artists are named Presidential Scholars in the Arts and are honored at the White House. Awards are based on merit in one of nine art forms; beginning in 2004, one artist in each form will receive a $10,000 Arts Gold Award. Applicants pay a $30 to $40 entry fee; fee waivers are available. Contact: National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, (800) 970-2787; www.artsawards.org.

*October 1 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

The Siemens Westinghouse Competition in math, science, and technology is open to high school students who are U.S. citizens or legal residents. Applicants working individually or in teams of two or three submit original research projects in science, mathematics, engineering, or technology. Sponsored by the Siemens Foundation, the contest awards more than $1 million in scholarships. Top prize for an individual entry is a $100,000 scholarship; the winning team splits a $100,000 scholarship. For more information, contact: Siemens Westinghouse Competition, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6730, Princeton, NJ 08541; (877) 822-5233; www.siemens- foundation.org.

*October 15 GEOGRAPHY

The National Geographic Bee awards college scholarships and classroom materials to students in 4th through 8th grades and their schools. Registered schools conduct the oral component, with school winners taking a written test to advance to the state competition. State-level winners receive $50 to $100 cash prizes and advance to the national competition; 10 national finalists receive a $500 cash prize, and the first-, second-, and third-place national winners receive $25,000, $15,000, and $10,000 college scholarships, respectively. The registration fee for eligible schools (those in the United States, its territories, and Washington, D.C.) is $50. A study guide and more information is available on the Web site. Contact: National Geographic Bee, National Geographic Society, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; (202) 828-6659; www.nationalgeograpic.com/geographybee.

—By Lillian Hsu & Marianne Hurst


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