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Censorship

Students protest on the floor of the Florida Capitol earlier this month to push for a ban on assault weapons.
Students protest on the floor of the Florida Capitol earlier this month to push for a ban on assault weapons.
Scott Keeler/The Tampa Bay Times via AP
School Climate & Safety Commentary Let Them March: Schools Should Not Censor Students
This week, as students walk out of school to advocate for school safety, they will be protected by the First Amendment, write two university professors.
Kathleen Bartzen Culver & Erica Salkin, March 9, 2018
4 min read
Classroom Technology Commentary Junior Scholars Have Much to Lose—and Gain—From Public Engagement
Young academics interested in becoming public scholars should proceed with caution, writes Seton Hall University’s Robert Kelchen.
Robert Kelchen, January 16, 2018
3 min read
Law & Courts Commentary The Problem With Calling Scholars 'Too Political'
Scholars shouldn't opt out of public-policy debates for which they have a deep well of knowledge, writes Diana Hess.
Diana Hess, January 16, 2018
2 min read
Law & Courts Commentary How (and When) Researchers Should Speak Truth to Power
Pedro A. Noguera shares the guidelines he uses to decide when he should participate in heated education debates.
Pedro A. Noguera, January 16, 2018
2 min read
Law & Courts Commentary Four Prerequisites for a Productive Education Debate
In our hyperpolarized political environment, education scholars should wade into public debates wisely, cautions Patrick J. Wolf.
Patrick J. Wolf, January 16, 2018
3 min read
Law & Courts Commentary When Does Scholarship Give Way to Bombast and Bluster?
For education scholars, when does public engagement cross the line into rote partisanship? Rick Hess proposes six steps to make the call.
Rick Hess, January 16, 2018
6 min read
Middlebury College students turn their backs to author Charles Murray during his lecture on March 2, 2017.
Middlebury College students turn their backs to author Charles Murray during his lecture on March 2, 2017.
Lisa Rathke/AP-File
Law & Courts Commentary No, Hate Speech Doesn't Violate the First Amendment
Teachers, take note: Students have some misconceptions about how to combat ideas they don't like, writes one social studies educator.
Benjamin Barbour, November 21, 2017
4 min read
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Getty/Getty
Families & the Community Commentary This Banned Book Week, Teaching Banned Books Isn't Enough
On controversial topics, teachers should focus on not just what they teach, but how they teach it, writes Jonna Perrillo.
Jonna Perrillo, September 22, 2017
4 min read
It's Time to Teach Our Ugly American History: Removing Confederate monuments won't solve our problems
The "Stars and Bars" became the first National Flag of the Confederacy in 1861.
Getty/Getty
Law & Courts Commentary It's Time to Teach Our Ugly American History
Tearing down traces of our white supremacist past won't solve our problems, writes the Slave Dwelling Project's founder.
Joseph Mcgill, September 7, 2017
4 min read
Journalism adviser Peter Riegelman, left, confers with student Ambyr Wagner during an editing session for The Mercury student newspaper at Bellows Free Academy in St. Albans, Vt. A new law in that state grants free-speech and free-press protections to both student journalists and their advisers.
Journalism adviser Peter Riegelman, left, confers with student Ambyr Wagner during an editing session for The Mercury student newspaper at Bellows Free Academy in St. Albans, Vt. A new law in that state grants free-speech and free-press protections to both student journalists and their advisers.
Caleb Kenna for Education Week
Law & Courts Legislative Measures Seek to Protect Student Press
More than a dozen states have been weighing bills to expand free-speech and free-press protections for student journalists and their teacher-advisers.
Madeline Will, June 6, 2017
7 min read
School & District Management Commentary The Steep Price of Political Homogeneity
Policymakers are less likely to support a university that appears hostile to roughly half of the electorate, argues Joshua Dunn.
Joshua Dunn, January 11, 2017
3 min read
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iStockphoto
Law & Courts Commentary Don't Silence Young Journalists
How schools treat young journalists matters because the future of journalism is precarious, writes Frank LoMonte of the Student Press Law Center.
Frank D. Lomonte, February 17, 2015
6 min read
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Brent Greenwood for Education Week; image text from Winona Daily Republican, 1863
Student Well-Being Commentary My High School Mascot Is Offensive
Under fire from officials in her Pennsylvania school district, student newspaper editor Gillian McGoldrick defends her stance against publishing the name of an offensive mascot.
Gillian Mcgoldrick, February 17, 2015
5 min read
Students line a busy intersection and overpass protesting against a Jefferson County, Colo., school board proposal to emphasize patriotism and downplay civil unrest in the teaching of U.S. history.
Students line a busy intersection and overpass protesting against a Jefferson County, Colo., school board proposal to emphasize patriotism and downplay civil unrest in the teaching of U.S. history.
--Brennan Linsley/AP
School & District Management Amid Backlash, Colo. Board Rethinks U.S. History Review
A Jefferson County school board proposal to ensure that U.S. history courses promote citizenship and patriotism and downplay civil disobedience led to weeks of student protests in the suburban Denver district.
Denisa R. Superville, October 3, 2014
4 min read