Published Online: October 11, 2010
Published in Print: October 12, 2010, as Technical Difficulties

Technical Difficulties

Despite being younger and fresh out of teacher-training programs, less experienced teachers are no more likely to use technology in the classroom than their more experienced colleagues, according to a study.

The finding, one of five “myths” the study refutes about teachers and technology, challenges the assumption that growing up technology-literate translates into being comfortable using technology as a teaching—or learning—tool. The study is based on a nationwide survey of more than 1,000 K-12 teachers, principals, and assistant principals. The survey was conducted by Grunwald Associates of Bethesda, Md., in partnership with Walden University.

Teacher Tech Use and 21st-Century Skills Instruction

According to a nationwide survey, teachers who described themselves as frequent technology users were more likely to place a greater emphasis on so-called 21st-century skills instruction and to perceive a stronger effect from student technology use on the development of these skills.

The researchers also found that administrators and teachers often differ about how best to support technology use in schools; that teachers don’t feel they receive enough professional development to help them effectively integrate available technology into their classrooms; and that teachers who are frequent users of technology are more likely to emphasize instruction in so-called 21st-century learning skills, such as problem-solving and critical thinking (see graphic).

Vol. 04, Issue 01, Page 8

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