November 16, 2016

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Vol. 36, Issue 13
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In a profession otherwise dominated by women at every level, fewer than 25 percent of the nation's superintendents are female.
From celebrations to tears to taunts, feelings have run high in classrooms around the country, teachers report.
President-elect Donald Trump's victory leaves widespread uncertainty about what's in store for key areas of public school policy under the first GOP administration in eight years.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Correction
News in Brief
Report Roundup
States conferred 95 kinds of diplomas to high school graduates last year—two more than the year before, according to the group Achieve.
A study finds that many African-American teachers are expected to teach lower-level classes or serve as school disciplinarians.
Young black teenagers embrace computers as integral to their futures, but they need more opportunities to learn to code and innovate with technology, according to a national survey.
A research analysis of dozens of studies finds links between improved school climates and narrowing gaps between low-income students and their peers.
Few people running the nation's school districts look like Sharon Contreras—black, Latino, and female. She talks with Education Week about her journey to the top job.
The U.S. Department of Education's proposed rules for how states and districts spend federal money for disadvantaged students under the Every Student Succeeds Act is under siege both by members of Congress and by state schools superintendents.
A 32-page affidavit alleges that Joy Hofmeister conspired for more than a year with several others to finance a negative campaign ad to oust then-Superintendent Janet Barresi.
The U.S. Supreme Court hears a special education dispute involving a girl with cerebral palsy who was denied the use of her service dog at school.
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a Virginia student's case against his school district over restroom access, in which a central issue is the proper interpretation of a federal regulation under Title IX.
President-elect Donald Trump will enter office with fellow Republicans still firmly in control of committees that would be in charge of pushing through his still-emerging education agenda.
Victories in the Nov. 8 election further strengthen the hand of Republican policymakers in state capitals as they frame their K-12 agendas under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
After nearly two decades of restrictions, educators say it will take time for schools to create new programs and hire bilingual teachers.
The state will keep its status as one of the most restrictive states when it comes to the expansion of the charter school sector.
Despite pouring money and muscle into campaigns from the White House race on down, the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association notched limited gains on Election Day.
Republicans may have their best chance yet to scrap—or at least seriously scale back—the Cabinet-level agency created under President Jimmy Carter.
When it comes to school management, asking if school districts should decentralize is the wrong question, writes Susan Moore Johnson.
Liberal arts education is essential for equipping students with the tools for good citizenship, writes Jim Haas.
The recent drop in school bullying incidents doesn’t necessarily mean schools have become more welcoming, writes Gregg Weinlein.
Letters
The history of the U.S. Department of Education holds lessons for shaking up the education status quo, writes Gary Beach.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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