April 13, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 27
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

Pressure stemming from the testing opt-out movement has led to some heated debate in the Empire State involving standards and the use of student scores in teacher evaluations.
Education and civil rights groups hailed the move as a critical step toward closing the "homework gap" that exists between students with and without adequate Internet access.
The Washoe County, Nev., district is working to develop sophisticated measurements of its comprehensive program to keep students engaged and on track to graduate.
With the field of Republican presidential candidates narrowed to three, Ohio Gov. John Kasich is the only one remaining with an extensive track record on education policy.
Students as young as 1st grade are learning Latin and Greek prefixes, suffixes, and bases as a way to build vocabulary skills.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Contrary to public perceptions, students are not being tracked into CTE programs, concludes a study of Arkansas schools.
California's second-largest district is recruiting nearly 2,000 minority and low-income students it says should be in Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses.
Many of the rest are just meeting minimal curriculum requirements, says a report from the Education Trust.
Best of the Blogs
Shirley M. Hufstedler, who died March 30 at age 90, put her stamp on the new agency at a turbulent time during the Carter administration.
The U.S. Supreme Court's deadlock in a case over teachers' union fees for non-members was a relief for organized labor, but cases on the issue still percolate in the lower courts.
Testing and funding prove thorny issues as a panel of educators, advocates, and experts grapples with the specifics of crafting rules under the Every Student Succeeds Act.
Educators and immigration activists are weighing in on a case at the U.S. Supreme Court April 18 with broad implications for millions of undocumented immigrant parents, their children, and schools.
Here are summaries of recent annual addresses by governors around the country.
Teachers shouldn't shy away from exposing students to thorny ethical issues in developmentally appropriate ways, writes educator Zoe Weil.
Experiential learning can inspire and prepare today's students for jobs that have yet to be invented, writes Hampshire College president Jonathan Lash.
Schools often buy technology for the classroom on the basis of marketing rather than careful analysis, writes Harold O. Levy.
Philadelphia's former deputy school superintendent Paul Kihn suggests a path forward for urban school districts that try to accomplish too much.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

Most Popular Stories