Future of Work Photos

What Does Digital Literacy Look Like in North Dakota?

By Education Week Photo Staff — April 03, 2019 1 min read
From left, sixth graders Maryann Hernandez, Fynn Gullicks, Kylie Duchsherer, and Sa’Rai Ridley work on an anti-bullying video at Horizon Middle School.
Sixth grade students at Wachter Middle School work on charting their digital device activities during a Digital Literacy course.
Library Media Specialist Stacy Olson shows kindergarteners at Rita Murphy Elementary School how to draw a circle for an Ozobot activity. The Ozobots are small, handheld robots that move and follow a marker line.
Seventh-grade students work with Coding Spheros devices in the STEM Academy class at New Town Middle School.
Sixth graders Kimberly Clark, left, Ariah Whitewater, and Gracie Jo Foote work on a typing lesson at New Town Middle School.
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Seventh-grade students work with Makey Makey invention kits in the STEM Academy class at New Town Middle School.
Senior Brings Rain Demaray works on a computer during a Senior Seminar Class at New Town High School. The course is aimed at having seniors become Choice Ready, a North Dakota state initiative.
Student Jeremiah Veach shows the computer he built at Legacy High School.
Math and Computer Science instructor Alicia Marsh leads an AP Computer Science class at Legacy High School.
A sixth grader follows a lesson about intellectual property rights and laws in relation to online materials at New Town Middle School.
Seventh grader Avery Demarce works on a Makey Makey keyboard invention kit activity during STEM Academy at New Town Middle School.
Rita Murphy Elementary School kindergartener Jakinley Scholin works on an Ozobot activity. The Ozobots are small, handheld robots that move and follow a marker line.

A version of this article first appeared in the Full Frame blog.

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