Curriculum Video

Beyond the Birds & the Bees - What Comprehensive Sex Education Looks Like

August 22, 2018 2:07

Sex education - and what it covers - varies widely from district to district, even school to school. In some areas, there is still an ongoing debate about whether this is a subject best left to parents, not teachers. Those who support comprehensive sexuality education say both have a role to play. Parents can communicate family values; teachers can cover everything from medically accurate information to relationship dynamics. Shafia Zaloom, a health educator and consultant based in San Francisco, travels to schools around the country teaching sexuality education. Zaloom believes this instruction should start as early as kindergarten, with the youngest students learning about empathy and understanding emotions. She outlines what it looks like from the earliest years through high school. Read more: edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/05/16/sex-education.html

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