Early Childhood Report Roundup

Math Instruction

By Sarah D. Sparks — April 16, 2019 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Students can understand and benefit from being introduced to algebraic concepts even in elementary school, a forthcoming study finds.

The study is part of a group of studies on Project LEAP, for Learning Early Algebra Progression, a program developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, TERC, the University of Texas at Austin, City College of New York, and Merrimack College.

“We’re not talking about taking a traditional [algebra] curriculum and pushing it earlier in the sequence,” said Rena Stroud, a senior researcher for the project at Merrimack College. “We’re talking about what algebraic thinking looks like in early grades.”

The three-year curriculum includes 18 weekly hourlong lessons, in each of grades 3-5. In the lessons, teachers introduce students to generalizing, representing, justifying, and reasoning about numbers and correct misconceptions that often trip up older students. Researchers randomly assigned 440 3rd graders in nine high-poverty schools to get either the algebraic lessons or standard grade-level arithmetic. By the end of 5th grade, Project LEAP students performed 13 percentage points higher in math than those in the control group.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the April 17, 2019 edition of Education Week as Math Instruction

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Boost Student Mental Health and Motivation With Data-Driven SEL
Improve student well-being and motivation with a personalized, data-driven SEL program.
Content provided by EmpowerU Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School Climate & Safety Webinar
Praise for Improvement: Supporting Student Behavior through Positive Feedback and Interventions
Discover how PBIS teams and educators use evidence-based practices for student success.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Management Webinar
Build a Digitally Responsive Educational Organization for Effective Digital-Age Learning
Chart a guided pathway to digital agility and build support for your organization’s mission and vision through dialogue and collaboration.
Content provided by Bluum

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Early Childhood What the Research Says Babies Are Saying Less Since the Pandemic: Why That's Concerning
Children born in the pandemic have heard fewer words and conversations. Their language development has suffered.
5 min read
Illustration of woman and boy talking.
<br/>BRO Vector/Getty
Early Childhood What the Research Says Early Education Pays Off. A New Study Shows How
Students from state-funded universal preschool, but not federal Head Start, took more-challenging courses in high school, a study finds.
4 min read
Image of a teacher and preschool students.
E+
Early Childhood Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About Early Learning?
Answer 7 questions to discover how much you know about early learning.
Early Childhood Opinion Biden’s 'Build Back Better' Bill Could Decimate the Child-Care Landscape
Many families rely on faith-based child-care centers—but those providers are in peril under the Build Back Better bill's current language.
4 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty