Curriculum News in Brief

Math-Curricula Scores Rise With Revised Review

By Liana Loewus — November 03, 2015 1 min read

A nonprofit that reviews curricula for common-core alignment, which came under fire after initially posting low ratings for

nearly all the texts it analyzed, has tweaked its process—and consequently upped the scores for several publishers.

In its first round of reviews, EdReports.org, a self-described Consumer Reports-style review of instructional materials, looked at K-8 mathematics materials and found that 17 of 20 math series evaluated failed to meet criteria for alignment to the Common Core State Standards.

Under its revised process, three series—Connected Math (Pearson), Go Math (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), and Math Expressions (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)—got improved scores for alignment in at least one grade level. My Math (McGraw Hill) was found to meet all expectations for usability in grades 4-5.

A version of this article appeared in the November 04, 2015 edition of Education Week as Math-Curricula Scores Rise With Revised Review

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