Curriculum News in Brief

Islam Section Faces Ax In Tenn. Draft Standards

By The Associated Press — October 04, 2016 1 min read

Seventh graders in Tennessee would no longer spend as much time learning about the history of Islam under a proposed draft revision of the state’s academic standards.

A section on Islam currently taught in social studies classes has been removed from the state board of education’s draft. Most of the sections involving Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and other religions have remained in the draft in some form.

Students would no longer be learning about the Quran or the differences between the Sunni and Shiite branches of the religion, for instance. Some Muslim history remains. Students would still be expected to learn about Malian king Mansa Musa and his pilgrimage to Mecca.

A version of this article appeared in the October 05, 2016 edition of Education Week as Islam Section Faces Ax In Tenn. Draft Standards

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