Curriculum

Have You Hugged A Museum Today?

February 23, 2009 1 min read

With all the wondrous and free exhibits at the Smithsonian Institution, we here in the Washington, D.C., area tend to take museums for granted. But the availability of such resources in communities large and small is not guaranteed, particularly as the economic crisis continues to put pressure on budgets.

Schools across the country, however, rely on museums for curriculum content, class trips, and enrichment opportunities. And now schools have many more opportunities to “visit” great museums through virtual field trips.

This week the American Association of Museums is calling on museum patrons to take action to ensure that all kinds of programming, including zoos and aquariums, can tap into the federal stimulus money to secure jobs and resources needed to keep the facilities open.

The Washington-based organization is urging people to take any number of steps to tell the powers that be about the roll museums play in their communities. Here are its recommendations for advocating for museums.
(Photo of Smithsonian Institution, courtesy of the Library of Congress)

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A version of this news article first appeared in the Curriculum Matters blog.

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