Law & Courts News in Brief

NAACP Files Complaint Over Wake County Schools

By The Associated Press — October 05, 2010 1 min read
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The complaint is based on a provision of the 1964 Civil Rights Act that forbids the use of tax dollars in discriminatory ways. The Education Department spends nearly $78 million a year on Wake County schools.

The NAACP wants to restore a long-used busing plan that had been designed to create socioeconomic balance in North Carolina’s largest school system. The five board members who voted to end the policy favor allowing students to attend schools closer to their homes instead.

A version of this article appeared in the October 06, 2010 edition of Education Week as NAACP Files Complaint Over Wake County Schools

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