States State of the States

Idaho

By Vaishali Honawar — January 15, 2008 1 min read

Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter (R) • Jan. 7

Gov. Otter wants to make K-12 education more cost-effective. In his State of the State address, he said he has asked a group of business and education leaders to assess how much Idaho spends on education and where, and compare that with the spending of high-performing school systems in the United States and abroad. He said his goal is to give students stronger skills to compete in a global economy. He also proposed a $50 million trust fund to help send low-income students to college.

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A version of this article appeared in the January 16, 2008 edition of Education Week

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