Every Student Succeeds Act News in Brief

ESSA Pilot Launched to Allow Federal Funds to Follow Student

By Alyson Klein — February 13, 2018 1 min read
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The U.S. Department of Education is officially opening up the Weighted Student Funding Pilot in the Every Student Succeeds Act. Up to 50 districts will be able to participate initially, with the possibility of adding more districts down the line.

Under the funding pilot, participating districts can combine federal, state, and local dollars into a single funding stream tied to individual students. English-language learners, poor children, and students in special education—who cost more to educate—would carry with them more money than other students.

In theory, adopting a weighted student funding formula could make it easier for districts to operate choice programs, since money would be tied to individual students and could therefore follow them to charter or virtual public schools. No extra federal resources are attached to the pilot.

A version of this article appeared in the February 14, 2018 edition of Education Week as ESSA Pilot Launched to Allow Federal Funds to Follow Student

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