Every Student Succeeds Act News in Brief

Education Dept. Tardy on Issuing Study of ‘Homework Gap,’ Advocacy Groups Say

By Benjamin Herold — February 13, 2018 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A coalition of 20 education advocacy groups are upset that the federal Institute of Education Sciences hasn’t produced a legally mandated report on students’ access to digital learning outside of school.

The findings are urgently needed now, the group says, because of the Federal Communications Commission’s current efforts to weaken the Lifeline program, which proponents say is crucial to closing the “homework gap” between students who do and do not have high-speed internet access at home.

The study was supposed to be released by last June. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Department of Education, in which IES is housed, said the report is currently undergoing scientific review and will be released in March or April.

At issue is a provision of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, signed into law in December 2015, that directs IES to produce a report on “student home access to digital learning” within 18 months.

For years, education-focused advocacy groups have lamented the “homework gap.” Most schools now regularly assign online homework, their argument goes, but many students still lack the home internet access they need to complete it.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the February 14, 2018 edition of Education Week as Education Dept. Tardy on Issuing Study of ‘Homework Gap,’ Advocacy Groups Say

Events

Student Well-Being K-12 Essentials Forum Boosting Student and Staff Mental Health: What Schools Can Do
Join this free virtual event based on recent reporting on student and staff mental health challenges and how schools have responded.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
Practical Methods for Integrating Computer Science into Core Curriculum
Dive into insights on integrating computer science into core curricula with expert tips and practical strategies to empower students at every grade level.
Content provided by Learning.com

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Every Student Succeeds Act Biden Education Department Approves One Request to Cancel State Tests But Rejects Others
Officials will allow D.C. to cancel tests. They denied similar requests from two other states and approved less extensive waiver requests.
6 min read
Image of students taking a test.
smolaw11/iStock/Getty
Every Student Succeeds Act Republicans Tell Miguel Cardona His Plan for ESSA Waivers Seems to Violate the Law
The Every Student Succeeds Act doesn't permit the education secretary to seek certain data he's asking for, the two GOP lawmakers say.
4 min read
White House press secretary Jen Psaki, left, listens as Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, center, speaks during a press briefing at the White House on March 17, 2021.
White House press secretary Jen Psaki, left, listens as Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, center, speaks during a press briefing at the White House on March 17, 2021.
Andrew Harnik/AP
Every Student Succeeds Act How Will ESSA Hold Up During COVID-19? Pandemic Tests the Law's Resilience
Lawmakers designed ESSA to limit mandates covering issues like how tests are used. Will that affect how well the law survives the pandemic?
6 min read
Every Student Succeeds Act Betsy DeVos Tells States Not to Expect Waivers From Annual Tests
The tests required by federal law are crucial to helping schools respond to the coronavirus pandemic and help vulnerable students, the education secretary said in a letter to chief state school officers.
3 min read