Michigan

LaTonya Peterson sits with her son Joshua Jackson, 16, as he attends school on his phone at home in Detroit, Friday, Jan. 7, 2022. Like many other parents in the 51,000-student Detroit Public Schools Community District, Peterson is faced once again with juggling home and work schedules around the educational needs of her son. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Student Well-Being Some Families Despair Over Return to Remote Learning
Parent Latonya Peterson sums up her frustration over schools returning — even temporarily — to virtual learning in three words: “I hate it.”
The Associated Press, January 7, 2022
4 min read
Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.
Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.
Paul Sancya/AP
Student Well-Being ‘There’s No Perfect Response’: Why Assessing Threats to Schools Is So Challenging
When it comes to how to respond to a possible threat, it’s local educators who have to make the call.
The Associated Press, December 20, 2021
5 min read
A well wisher kneels to pray at a memorial on the sign of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at the school, killing several students and wounding multiple other people, including a teacher.
A mourner kneels at a memorial in Oxford, Mich., site of the deadliest school shooting since 2018.
Paul Sancya/AP
School Climate & Safety What This Week's Mass Shooting Can Teach Us About School Safety
The incident in Michigan, the deadliest school shooting in three years, will add to a wrenching school safety debate.
Stephen Sawchuk, December 1, 2021
7 min read
Collage of figures and money texture.
Collage by Laura Baker/Education Week and iStock/Getty
Education Funding State K-12 Spending Is Inequitable and Inadequate. See Where Yours Ranks
There's a $17,000 per student difference between the highest- and lowest-spending states. High-poverty schools suffer especially.
Mark Lieberman, October 28, 2021
4 min read
Teaching Profession Video Six Schools in Seven Years: Where One Black Male Teacher Found the Right Fit
A black male teacher in Detroit on the value of finding the right school for both staff and students.
Jaclyn Borowski , September 29, 2021
4:28
Illustration of students reading with pie chart.
Getty
States From Our Research Center Map: A-F Grades, Rankings for States on School Quality
Here’s a map showing grades for all the states on this year’s Quality Counts summative report card, on which the nation gets a C overall.
EdWeek Research Center, September 1, 2021
1 min read
Illustration of students reading with pie chart.
Getty
States Nation Gets a 'C' on Latest School Quality Report Card, While N.J. Again Boasts Top Grade
A slight increase in this year's Quality Counts score isn't enough to boost the nation's school system above last year's middling grade.
Sterling C. Lloyd & Alex Harwin, September 1, 2021
8 min read
Illustration of students reading with pie chart.
Getty
States From Our Research Center State Grades on K-12 Achievement: 2021 Map and Rankings
Examine the grades and scores that states and the nation earned on K-12 achievement, along with how they scored on a host of indicators.
EdWeek Research Center, September 1, 2021
1 min read
An old swing-set on a playground at Heritage Elementary School in Lewis Center, OH on July 7, 2021. New construction and repairs will be paid for by a school levy since the district didn’t qualify for pandemic relief funding.
The Zionsville school district in Indiana is one of roughly 1,000 in the U.S. that received no money from the second and third rounds of federal stimulus aid during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Maddie McGarvey for Education Week
Budget & Finance Some School Districts Are Feeling COVID-19 Stimulus Envy
Thousands of districts got little to nothing from recent federal stimulus aid, surfacing longstanding tensions over inadequate school funding.
Mark Lieberman, July 12, 2021
11 min read
Conceptual image of a school door with projected shadows of students.
Collage by Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: iStock/Getty)
School & District Management Interactive Enrollment Data: How Many Students Went Missing in Your State?
America's public school system lost more than 1.3 million students during the coronavirus pandemic, according to an Education Week analysis.
1 min read
urban 1207362069 072021 blue
piranka/E+
School & District Management The Fastest-Improving City School Districts Aren't the Ones You Might Expect
An analysis of how much city districts are overcoming their demographic odds reveals some surprising success stories as well as others where progress is slipping.
Stephen Sawchuk, July 1, 2021
8 min read
Students participate in class outside at the Woodland Pond School, a private school  located near Bangor, Maine. Maine experienced one of the nation's largest drops in student enrollment this school year, according to an EdWeek analysis.
Students participate in class outside at the Woodland Pond School, a private school located near Bangor, Maine. Maine experienced one of the nation's largest drops in student enrollment this school year, according to an EdWeek analysis.
Photo courtesy of Woodland Pond School
School & District Management More Than 1 Million Students Didn't Enroll During the Pandemic. Will They Come Back?
Education Week analyzed state data to gather a more comprehensive understanding of this year's enrollment loss.
Eesha Pendharkar, June 17, 2021
6 min read
States Interactive Map: Where Critical Race Theory Is Under Attack
Education Week summarizes where state policymakers are attempting to censor the way teachers talk about racism and gender.
June 11, 2021
5 min read
The Mississippi Department of Education offices are seen in Jackson, Miss. on March 19, 2020. The state's board of education decided this winter that it would suspend the retention policy for third graders this year, allowing all students to pass on to the fourth grade even if they fail the standardized reading test.
The Mississippi Department of Education offices are seen in Jackson, Miss. The state's board of education decided this winter that it would suspend the retention policy for 3rd graders this year, allowing all students to pass on to the 4th grade even if they fail the standardized reading test.
Rogelio V. Solis/AP
Reading & Literacy Pandemic Prompts Some States to Pass Struggling 3rd Graders
As families wrestle with online learning, a pandemic economy and mental health difficulties, some states are delaying 3rd grade retention.
Aallyah Wright, Stateline.org, June 7, 2021
8 min read