Equity & Diversity News in Brief

Wake County School Board Faces Civil Rights Probe

By McClatchy-Tribune — November 30, 2010 1 min read
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School leaders in Wake County, N.C., will have to defend their student-assignment and -discipline policies to federal civil rights investigators, who informed the board last month that they would respond to complaints filed by the NAACP.

If the school system is declared in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the 143,000-student Wake County district could lose about $80 million a year in federal funding.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, at both the state and national levels, alleged in complaints that the board engaged in racial bias by eliminating diversity in the assignment policy, through student reassignments made this year, and in the way minority students are disproportionately suspended. The school board also faces a review by a national accrediting body.

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A version of this article appeared in the December 01, 2010 edition of Education Week as Wake County School Board Faces Civil Rights Probe

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