School & District Management

Teachers’ Children Can’t Get Leg Up

January 23, 2007 1 min read

To help attract top-notch teachers, some charter schools would like to offer guaranteed slots in those schools for employees’ children.

But Uncle Sam won’t allow it if the charters hope to get federal start-up grants.

Just this month, a batch of applicants for new Arkansas charters amended their proposals to remove such an enrollment preference after they learned that otherwise the schools wouldn’t be eligible for the federal aid.

In November, Texas officials asked the U.S. Department of Education for an exemption from the federal rule, and Colorado made a similar plea last summer. Neither state had received an answer as of last week.

“Charter schools are losing good staff members to other public and private schools due to their inability to give the children of staff members priority in admission,” wrote Shirley J. Neeley, the Texas education commissioner, and Geraldine Miller, the chairwoman of the Texas board of education, in a Nov. 17 letter to the federal agency.

Federal guidelines for the $215 million Charter School Program allow only a few enrollment preferences for schools that have more applicants than slots, such as for siblings of current students or children of a charter’s founders.

The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools has urged the Education Department to amend the nonregulatory guidance for the federal Charter School Program so that a charter school may give preference to its teachers’ children, so long as they make up just a small slice of enrollment.

If too many exemptions are allowed, schools risk becoming too exclusive, said Todd M. Ziebarth, a senior analyst at the Washington-based advocacy group.

Eight states have language in their charter laws allowing preferences for teachers’ children, the alliance says.

Patsy O’Neill, who leads the San Antonio-based Resource Center for Charter Schools, which works with Texas charters, said nearly all regular districts in that state already allow the option.

“If 98 percent of traditional districts allow that enrollment preference,” she said, “then we think charters should have that same policy.”

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 24, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Building Leadership Excellence Through Instructional Coaching
Join this webinar for a discussion on instructional coaching and ways you can link your implement or build on your program.
Content provided by Whetstone Education/SchoolMint
Teaching Webinar Tips for Better Hybrid Learning: Ask the Experts What Works
Register and ask your questions about hybrid learning to our expert panel.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
Family Engagement for Student Success With Dr. Karen Mapp
Register for this free webinar to learn how to empower and engage families for student success featuring Karen L. Mapp.
Content provided by Panorama Education & PowerMyLearning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Supervising Behavior Analyst (BCBA)
Weston, Florida, United States
Camelot Education
Supervising Behavior Analyst (BCBA)
Alexandria, Virginia, United States
Camelot Education
Training Specialist (full time, center-based)
Alexandria, Virginia, United States
Camelot Education
Training Specialist (full time, center-based)
Silver Spring, Maryland, United States
Camelot Education

Read Next

School & District Management New York City's Equity-Minded Schools Chief Resigns
Richard A. Carranza, the chancellor of the New York City schools, announced Feb. 26 he will step down from the job next month.
4 min read
Richard Carranza, Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, arrives to Public School 188 The Island School as students arrive for in-person classes, on, Sept. 29, 2020, in the Manhattan borough of New York.
Richard A. Carranza announced he will depart the top New York City schools job in March.
John Minchillo/AP
School & District Management Opinion New Resource Tracks School System Reopening
The Return to Learn Tracker identifies the current instructional model of all regular public school districts with three or more schools.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School & District Management San Francisco School Board Pauses Renaming 44 Schools, Promises to Consult Historians
The renaming of 44 schools in the San Francisco Unified School District is apparently being put on hold after intense blowback.
Greg Keraghosian
1 min read
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.<br/><br/>
Jeff Chiu/AP
School & District Management Superintendent Who Led During COVID-19 School Shutdowns Gets Top Honors
Michelle Reid of Washington state's Northshore district, one of the very first to close schools last March, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
3 min read
Michelle Reid, superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington
Michelle Reid, the superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
courtesy of AASA, the School Superintendents Association