Professional Development Report Roundup

Teacher Preparation

“HarvardX and MITx: Four Years of Open Online Courses—Fall 2012-Summer 2016"
By Brenda Iasevoli — January 24, 2017 1 min read

Teachers make up about one-third of participants in the massive open online courses offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, according to a new report by researchers at the two institutions.

The report is based on four years of data from the courses, known as MOOCs, on edX, a nonprofit provider of online classes for lifelong learners worldwide, which was started in 2012 by the two universities. They found 32 percent of MOOC-takers said they work (or worked) as teachers. Nineteen percent of the teacher participants said they took an open online course—mainly in humanities, history, religion, design, and education—to learn more about topics they already teach.

Teacher participation in courses ranged from above 60 percent for classes provided by the school of education or those explicitly targeted to teachers, to a little over 20 percent for computer science and some other science courses.

Overall, 16 percent of teachers earned a certificate for the course they took, twice the rate of average MOOC participants.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 25, 2017 edition of Education Week as Teacher Preparation

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Making Digital Literacy a Priority: An Administrator’s Perspective
Join us as we delve into the efforts of our panelists and their initiatives to make digital skills a “must have” for their district. We’ll discuss with district leadership how they have kept digital literacy
Content provided by Learning.com
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How Schools Can Implement Safe In-Person Learning
In order for in-person schooling to resume, it will be necessary to instill a sense of confidence that it is safe to return. BD is hosting a virtual panel discussing the benefits of asymptomatic screening
Content provided by BD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Districts Are Centering Relationships and Systemic SEL for Back to School 21-22
As educators and leaders consider how SEL fits into their reopening and back-to-school plans, it must go beyond an SEL curriculum. SEL is part of who we are as educators and students, as well as
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Whitepaper
Proven Credentialed Digital Professional Development Open to All Teachers
This paper focuses on the Verizon Innovative Learning project; their partnership with its nonprofit partner Digital Promise; how their pr...
Content provided by Verizon
Professional Development Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About SEL Inclusivity?
Quiz Yourself: Is professional development SEL inclusive for educators?
Professional Development What Do Principals Want From Professional Development?
Only about a quarter of elementary school principals say they've had access to a mentor or coach in the last two years, a new report finds.
5 min read
Image shows a silhouette of a person learning, and the components to make that work is represented by gears.
iStock/Getty