School & District Management

Online Clearinghouse Sizes Up What Works in Array of Programs

By Debra Viadero — October 03, 2006 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The U.S. Department of Education isn’t the only organization in Washington with a “what works” Web site.

Over the past five years, Child Trends, a nonpartisan, nonprofit research group, has been quietly compiling its own electronic clearinghouse on effective programs and practices aimed at improving the well-being of children and families.

Kristin A. Moore, a senior scholar at the group, said the online study archive grew out of research Child Trends was doing to inform grantmaking decisions for three foundations.

See Also

The Atlantic Philanthropies and the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, both based in New York City, and the Miami-based John S. and James L. Knight Foundation wanted to know whether there were interventions in specific areas, such as after-school programs or school readiness, that had research evidence attesting to their effectiveness.

With permission from the funders, Child Trends decided to put the results of its searches online for anyone to use.

Like the Education Department’s What Works Clearinghouse, the analysts at the 50-person research organization took their cue from biomedical research in relying on evidence from rigorous experiments or quasi-experiments to determine whether programs “work” or not.

Evidence Scarce

And, like the federal researchers, they, too, found out that, in many areas, such studies were few and far between. (“‘One Stop’ Research Shop Seen as Slow to Yield Views That Educators Can Use,” Sept. 27, 2006.)

“But, given that most programs on the ground have not been experimentally evaluated, we also decided not to ignore them,” Ms. Moore said.

So programs with positive results that come from studies falling short of that high methodological bar are placed under a category on the Web site called “best bets.”

Ms. Moore said that column also includes programs and strategies recommended through “provider wisdom.”

“There are a lot of people out there working very hard, and we want to include their input as well,” she said.

As a result, the site recommends a little more in the way of promising practices than the Education Department’s What Works Clearinghouse does.

So far, the offerings include links to the full texts of around 170 social-science experiments and reviews of the research supporting interventions across a wide range of areas, including a few in the education.

The Child Trends What Works clearinghouse can be found at www.childtrends.org.

The site lists several databases, but the “what works” results from several of them are merged under the heading LINKS, for Life-course Interventions to Nurture Kids Successfully.

A version of this article appeared in the October 04, 2006 edition of Education Week as Online Clearinghouse Sizes Up What Works in Array of Programs


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
6 Key Trends in Teaching and Learning
As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and a return to the classroom for many—we come better prepared, but questions remain. How will the last year impact teaching and learning this school
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Evaluating Equity to Drive District-Wide Action this School Year
Educational leaders are charged with ensuring all students receive equitable access to a high-quality education. Yet equity is more than an action. It is a lens through which we continuously review instructional practices and student
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Letter to the Editor School Mask Mandates: Pandemic, ‘Panicdemic,’ or Personal?
"A pandemic is based on facts. A 'panicdemic' is based on fears. Today, we have both," writes a professor.
1 min read
School & District Management How 'Vaccine Discrimination' Laws Make It Harder for Schools to Limit COVID Spread
In Montana and Ohio, the unvaccinated are a protected class, making it tough to track and contain outbreaks, school leaders say.
4 min read
Principal and District Superintendent Bonnie Lower takes the temperature of a student at Willow Creek School as the school reopened, Thursday, May 7, 2020, in Willow Creek, Mont.
Bonnie Lower, a principal and district superintendent in Willow Creek, Mont., checks the temperature of a student as Willow Creek School reopened for in-person instruction in the spring.
Ryan Berry/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP
School & District Management Opinion 'Futures Thinking' Can Help Schools Plan for the Next Pandemic
Rethinking the use of time and place for teachers and students, taking risks, and having a sound family-engagement plan also would help.
17 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
School & District Management Opinion The Consequence of Public-Health Officials Racing to Shutter Schools
Public-health officials' lack of concern for the risks of closing schools may shed light on Americans' reticence to embrace their directives.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty