Equity & Diversity News in Brief

N.C. Board Rejects Ban on Confederate Flags

By The Associated Press — March 07, 2017 1 min read

A North Carolina school board has voted not to ban the Confederate flag from school grounds, rejecting two pleas from a local chapter of the NAACP to establish the policy.

The Orange County board of education decided instead last week to establish an equity committee to advise the board on several issues, including symbolic speech.

The Northern Orange County NAACP had asked the board to ban the Confederate flag on school grounds. Some students, parents, employees, and community members said there’s been an increase in Confederate flags appearing on vehicles, bags, and pieces of clothing on campuses, which the organization says can be intimidating.

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A version of this article appeared in the March 08, 2017 edition of Education Week as N.C. Board Rejects Ban on Confederate Flags

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