School & District Management Interactive

Map: Where Were Schools Required to Be Open for the 2020-21 School Year?

State-by-state map of where school buildings were open or closed
July 28, 2020 | Updated: June 14, 2021 1 min read
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From July 2020 to June of 2021, Education Week tracked each state’s mandates on K-12 in-person instruction due to the coronavirus.

Some states did not weigh in at all on school operations, leaving the decisions entirely to local education and public health leaders.

As of June 8, at least 14 states required in-person instruction to be available in all or some grades either full- or part-time. At least nine states had already mandated full-time, in-person learning for the 2021-22 school year.

State-by-State Map of Where School Buildings Are Opened or Closed

Data Notes/Methodology

Updated May 19, 2021

  • No order (Yellow) - In-person instruction decisions are currently being made on a local level, with states only providing guidelines or recommendations.
  • Full closure (Dark Red) - In-person instruction is not allowed.
  • Ordered open (Blue) - In-person instruction must be available to all students, either full- or part-time.
  • Partial closure (Light Red) – Full-time in-person instruction is either not allowed in certain regions of the state or is only available for certain age groups. Hybrid instruction may be allowed.
  • Some grades ordered open (Light Blue) - In-person instruction must be available for certain grade levels, either full- or part-time.
  • For states where the academic year has ended, the status reflects any orders that were in place on the last day of school.

State enrollment numbers are from the National Center for Education Statistics. They are from the 2018-19 school year and include adult education students.

Download This State-by-State Building Reopening Data

Data file last updated: June 14, 2021 4:41 pm ET

Download the Data

State-Level Details

Related

Contact Information

For media or research inquiries about this table and data, contact library@educationweek.org.

How to Cite This Page

Map: Where Has COVID-19 Closed Schools? Where Are They Open? (2020, July 28). Education Week. Retrieved Month Day, Year from https://www.edweek.org/leadership/map-where-are-schools-closed/2020/07

Reporting/Analysis: Education Week staff

Design/Visualization: Emma Patti Harris

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