School & District Management News in Brief

Lead Levels Force Shutdown of Newark Water Fountains

By Denisa R. Superville — March 15, 2016 1 min read
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School leaders in the Newark, N.J., district ordered water fountains at 30 schools to be turned off after tests found elevated levels of lead in some water samples, state environmental officials said last week.

Of approximately 300 samples taken in the 30 buildings during annual testing, 59 showed levels above federal guidelines.

While the ongoing crisis over lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, Mich., has dominated the national consciousness, lead contamination is a problem in many communities.

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A version of this article appeared in the March 16, 2016 edition of Education Week as Lead Levels Force Shutdown of Newark Water Fountains

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