Special Report
Equity & Diversity

Hispanic Girls Face Special Barriers on Road to College

By Katherine Leal Unmuth — June 01, 2012 5 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

After 15-year-old Valerie Sanchez spent a day of her spring break in Fort Worth touring the well-manicured grounds of Texas Christian University and listening to an inspirational talk from members of a Latina sorority, she felt sure of her future.

“I’m going to college,” says the teenager after the visit organized by the Dallas center of Girls Inc., a national nonprofit group. “I want to be the first in my family.”

But like many young Latinas, she faces a host of challenges in the coming years, as she works to graduate from high school, go on to community college, and then enroll in a four-year institution.

Sanchez moved from Mexico when she was 9 years old and enrolled in the 156,000-student Dallas Independent School District. After taking bilingual classes taught in Spanish and English, she found the transition to all-English classes in middle school difficult.

Consequently, Sanchez was held back in the 8th grade last year at Edison Middle Learning Center here in Dallas. She now attends tutoring sessions after school in addition to programs provided by Girls Inc. that focus on career planning and pregnancy prevention.

The plight of Latino young men often dominates the discussion of graduation rates. But young Latinas also face cultural, economic, and educational barriers to finishing high school and entering and completing college.

“There’s the assumption that girls are doing fine,” says Lara Kaufmann, a senior counsel at the National Women’s Law Center, in Washington. “It’s true that within ethnic groups girls are doing better than boys. But they’re not doing well.”

Falling Behind

While Hispanic women are more likely to graduate from high school and college when compared with Hispanic men, some statistics suggest they trail behind African-American and white women on some such measures.

Postsecondary Engagement Lags for Latinas

Latinas ages 18 to 24 have lower postsecondary-engagement rates than Asian, white, and black women of the same age bracket. Asian women are twice as likely as Latinas to be either enrolled in higher education or to have a postsecondary credential.

BRIC ARCHIVE

SOURCE: EPE Research Center, 2012. Analysis of data from the American Community Survey (2008-2010), U.S. Census Bureau.

According to a Pew Hispanic Center analysis of 2011 Census survey data, about 17 percent of Hispanic females ages 25 to 29 have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with about 10 percent of Hispanic males, 43 percent of white females, and 23 percent of black females in that age span.

To delve into why such gaps persist, the National Women’s Law Center collaborated with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on a 2009 study on educational outcomes for Latinas.

While the middle and high school girls interviewed in the report said they wanted to graduate from college, they also said they didn’t expect to achieve that goal. The report also cited challenges for them in reaching educational goals, including such difficulties as immigration status, poverty, discrimination, low self-esteem, higher rates of depression and attempted suicide, gender stereotypes, and limited English proficiency.

A cultural emphasis on loyalty to family also can play a role. Latinas may be expected to take on additional duties as caregivers, such as helping to watch younger children or aid elderly family members. They may be expected to live with their parents until they are married, making it difficult to leave home to go away to college.

Ties That Bind

Celina Cardenas mentors Hispanic girls in the 37,000-student Richardson Independent School District in the Dallas suburbs. Cardenas, a district community-relations coordinator, is Mexican-American and feels she can relate to their experiences.

Valerie Sanchez, 15, works on a writing assignment during reading class at the Thomas A. Edison Middle Learning Center in Dallas. The eighth grader is working to become the first in her family to attend college.

“It’s kind of like you’re born with responsibility—especially the girls,” she says. “Doing something on your own may not sit very comfortably with them because they may not want to let anyone down. I talk to them a lot about not feeling selfish that they’re disappointing their family by going away, and understanding there’s nothing wrong with having those goals.”

Family loyalty can cause Hispanic girls to choose less-competitive colleges than they are qualified to attend so they can keep living with their parents. They may also not be well informed about financial-aid opportunities to attend more expensive schools.

University of Texas at San Antonio education professor Anne-Marie Nuñez says that when girls live at home while in college, they may have a hard time focusing on their studies because of family obligations.

“They may be juggling multiple responsibilities that pull them away from being able to focus on their studies,” Nuñez says. “Other family members may not understand the energy they need to focus on their studies.”

In Texas, a nonprofit online magazine written by girls, called Latinitas, aims to empower young women. The organization also provides workshops, mentoring, and college tours. On the website, Saray Argumedo, 23, shares her own experiences about the tension with her family when she studied at the University of Texas at El Paso.

“All I can do is ask for forgiveness when my mom questions why I spend all my time outside of the house studying, working, and getting involved in my community,” she writes. “I thought that they would be proud of me, but why are they so angry?”

Teenage Motherhood

Young Latinas also are more likely than most young women in the United States to have their own children as teenagers. According to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, in Washington, about 52 percent of Latinas become pregnant before age 20, nearly twice the national average. In Dallas, the nonprofit group Alley’s House helps mothers complete their General Educational Development, or GED, studies and build their confidence.

BRIC ARCHIVE

Yesenya Consuelo, 19, dropped out of Spruce High School in Dallas her freshman year when she became pregnant with her now-4-year-old daughter. Consuelo wants to study at a community college to be a surgical technologist, but she needs to pass the math portion of the GED, which she has failed twice. She comes to Alley’s House for math tutoring four days a week.

Consuelo says her daughter is her motivation to finish school. “I’m trying to be the best I can for her,” she says.

Despite the challenges, says Nuñez, the education professor, “the truth is Latino families have as high aspirations as other groups. Sometimes, they just don’t know how to translate those aspirations to reality.”

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
How Whole-Child Student Data Can Strengthen Family Connections
Learn how district leaders can use these actionable strategies to increase family engagement in their student’s education and boost their academic achievement.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
College & Workforce Readiness Webinar
The School to Workforce Gap: How Are Schools Setting Students Up For Life & Lifestyle Success?
Hear from education and business leaders on how schools are preparing students for their leap into the workforce.
Content provided by Find Your Grind

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Equity & Diversity How to Talk to LGBTQ Students About the Colorado Nightclub Shooting
The tragedy is a difficult moment for a group of students already under strain.
4 min read
Elijah Newcomb of Colorado Springs lays flowers near a gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colo., Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022 where a shooting occurred late Saturday night.
Elijah Newcomb of Colorado Springs lays flowers near a gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colo., the morning after a mass shooting there that killed five people.
Geneva Heffernan/AP
Equity & Diversity Opinion The Real Value of Equity Directors for Districts
Though some in education dismiss equity directors as merely symbolic or even doomed to fail, the role is enormously consequential.
Decoteau J. Irby
6 min read
111622 opinion 14Irby equity director 1174940279
iStock/Getty
Equity & Diversity Opinion Stop Demonizing Black Boys. Let Them Play, Too
The play of Black boys is judged differently—more dangerous, more violent—than that of peers, writes teacher-educator Altheria Caldera.
Altheria Caldera
4 min read
Conceptual illustration of a black boy looking through a dream door at a glowing stairway.
Jorm Sangsom/iStock/Getty
Equity & Diversity Q&A How Is White Supremacy Embedded in School Systems Today? A Scholar Explains
John Diamond, a professor of sociology and education policy at Brown University, discusses how educators can make schools more equitable.
8 min read
Members of the 101st Airborne Division take up positions outside Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., on Sept. 26, 1957. A plan to only grant Little Rock partial control of its schools is drawing complaints that the district may further segregate 62 years after nine black students were escorted into an all-white high school, and a push to end the local teachers union's bargaining power is stirring fears of even more instability.
Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., on Sept. 26, 1957, the year nine black students, escorted by the National Guard, integrated the school.
AP