Student Well-Being News in Brief

Chicago Schools Failed to Report Cases of Sexual Abuse, Investigation Reveals

By The Associated Press — June 12, 2018 1 min read
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Chicago public school officials failed to protect hundreds of students who were sexually abused by school employees, a newspaper investigation finds.

The Chicago Tribune says its probe revealed teachers and principals often failed to alert child-welfare investigators or police when students disclosed abuse despite the state’s mandated reporting law.

Some employees failed to immediately notify authorities when allegations were made. Others conducted investigations of their own before informing experts. In cases where employees did act on allegations, students often endured additional psychological pain through repeated interrogations.

The district acknowledges its current practices are flawed, but said officials are working to implement a series of policy changes.

A version of this article appeared in the June 13, 2018 edition of Education Week as Chicago Schools Failed to Report Cases of Sexual Abuse, Investigation Reveals

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