May 2, 2018

This Issue
Vol. 37, Issue 29
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

Finding the revenue and navigating state politics can be daunting even when there’s agreement that teachers are underpaid and due a raise.
New federal data on 99 percent of the nation’s schools tally up a long and growing list of inequities that disadvantage students of color and those with disabilities.
In some of the hottest real estate markets, principals can't afford to buy homes. Some districts aim to bridge the gaps between salaries and housing costs.
A New York City effort aimed at preparing teachers to take learning outside the classroom and into the community may be leading to improvements in science achievement and teacher retention, according to some study results.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Union leaders in West Virginia and Oklahoma, where recent teacher strikes led to higher pay, are advising their peers in Arizona and other states on the keys to successful protests.
New research shows that early-childhood programs can't be seen as a one-shot inoculation that will sustain children throughout their academic careers.
An experiment with embedding 'growth-mindset' messaging in software appeared to help students persist when they encountered difficulty, and raised ethical concerns.
The statistics reveal disparities in the share of black and Latino students who take algebra early—as well as in advanced science courses.
Black students make up nearly a third of all students arrested at school or referred to law enforcement, but only 15 percent of overall enrollment, OCR data show.
The Endrew F. decision broadened the standard of what’s required on behalf of students with disabilities, putting a renewed focus on those needs, advocates say.
The U.S. Department of Education has released state-by-state spending estimates for key programs based on the fiscal 2018 spending bill President Donald Trump signed last month.
Two of the largest states are still awaiting approval from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos on their plans for putting the Every Student Succeeds Act into effect.
Amid widespread teacher strikes and protests, one Kentucky superintendent makes an appeal for increased investment in education.
As the education community chases the latest trend, it often overlooks what works for helping students learn, writes Mike Schmoker.
Grossly underpaid teachers are taking drastic action to demand the respectable salaries they deserve, writes Donald R. Sheldon.
Letters
After visiting 200 schools in 50 states, author Ted Dintersmith explores how the most remarkable educators are helping students thrive.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations. Additional grants in support of Editorial Projects in Education’s data journalism and video capacity come from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and the Schott Foundation for Public Education. (Updated 04/12/2018)

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented