Education

Whites Surpassed in UC Admissions

By Alyson Klein — May 09, 2006 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

For the first time, more Asian-American than white students have been admitted to the University of California system.

About 36 percent of the 55,000 students accepted for fall 2006 in the UC system were Asian-American, while 35.6 percent were white, according to statistics released last month.

Ricardo Vazquez, a spokesman for the 10-campus system, said Asian-Americans have long outpaced whites in the percentage of students who meet the university system’s requirements for admission, which include earning a certain grade point average relative to their ACT or SAT scores.

California Diversity

For the first time, more Asian-American than white freshmen have been admitted to the University of California system.

1997 2006
Asian-American 33% 36%
White 40.8 35.6
Chicano/Latino 14.1 17.6
African-American 3.8 3.4
American Indian 0.8 0.6
Other/Decline to state 7.6 5.8

SOURCE: University of California System

Applicants who meet the requirements are guaranteed a slot at one of the UC campuses, although they might not get into their first choice.

“Asian-Americans achieve eligibility at the highest rate of any group,” Mr. Vazquez said, noting that 31.4 percent of Asian-American high school graduates in California meet the UC system’s admissions criteria, compared with about 16 percent of whites. About 14 percent of this year’s high school graduates in the state are Asian-American, while about 38 percent are white.

Mr. Vazquez said the numbers could also be explained by the fact that Asian-Americans constitute an increasingly higher proportion of the applicant pool. Their applications were up about 11 percent this year over 2005.

Racial- and ethnic-minority groups, particularly Asian-Americans and Latinos, have been steadily gaining a larger share of the system’s slots over the past decade, Mr. Vazquez said.

He said that while those numbers are encouraging, the state “still has a lot work” to do to increase the number of students admitted from underrepresented groups. Californians passed a ballot initiative in 1996 that prohibited the use of race-based affirmative action in admissions.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 10, 2006 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Webinar
Stronger Together: Integrating Social and Emotional Supports in an Equity-Based MTSS
Decades of research have shown that when schools implement evidence-based social and emotional supports and programming, academic achievement increases. The impact of these supports – particularly for students of color, students from low-income communities, English
Content provided by Illuminate Education
Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Whole Child Approach to Supporting Positive Student Behavior 
To improve student behavior, it’s important to look at the root causes. Social-emotional learning may play a preventative role.

A whole child approach can proactively support positive student behaviors.

Join this webinar to learn how.
Content provided by Panorama

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: November 17, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Nearly a Million Kids Vaccinated in Week 1, White House Says
Experts say there are signs that it will be difficult to sustain the initial momentum.
4 min read
Leo Hahn, 11, gets the first shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021, at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. Last week, U.S. health officials gave the final signoff to Pfizer's kid-size COVID-19 shot, a milestone that opened a major expansion of the nation's vaccination campaign to children as young as 5. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Education Briefly Stated: October 27, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read