Education

Stat of the Week — March 9, 2007

March 09, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Teacher Attrition Rate on the Rise

The National Center for Education Statistics, the statistical arm of the U.S. Department of Education, recently released a report with findings regarding teacher attrition and mobility gleaned from the Teacher Follow-up Surveys (TFS) conducted five times between 1988-89 and 2004-05. The TFS samples elementary and secondary school teachers in grades K-12 in the 50 states and the District of Columbia as a follow-up to the previous year’s Schools and Staffing Survey. The NCES report includes longitudinal attrition data for teachers from the 1988-89 to the 2004-05 school year. This Stat of the Week looks at public school teachers who left the profession, referred to as teacher leavers.

Reasons for Leaving Rated as Very or Extremely Important: 2004-05

*Click image to view the full chart.

BRIC ARCHIVE

SOURCE: National Center for Education Statistics, 2007

During the 1988-99 school year, there were 2,386,500 public school teachers who taught in grades K-12. Among them, 132,300 teachers, or 5.6 percent, left the teaching profession for various reasons. Although the percentage of public school teacher leavers declined slightly in the 1991-92 school year, the percentage rose each subsequent year that the survey was conducted. In the 2004-05 school year, 269,600 public school teachers, or 8.4 percent, left teaching. The accompanying chart depicts the teacher attrition trend from 1998 to 2005.

BRIC ARCHIVE

The report also investigates the reasons why teachers leave the profession. Among those teachers who left in the 2003-04 school year, the reasons most often cited as very or extremely important were: retirement (31 percent), to pursue a position other than that of a K-12 teacher (25 percent), other family or personal reasons (20 percent), pregnancy or child rearing (19 percent), dissatisfied with previous school or teaching assignment (16 percent), dissatisfied with teaching as a career (15 percent), and school staffing action (15 percent). Better salary or benefits was chosen by 14 percent.

For more detailed information on state education policies about teacher recruitment, retention, salaries, or professional development and mentoring, visit our Education Counts database.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
Strategies for Incorporating SEL into Curriculum
Empower students to thrive. Learn how to integrate powerful social-emotional learning (SEL) strategies into the classroom.
Content provided by Be GLAD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Leadership in Education: Building Collaborative Teams and Driving Innovation
Learn strategies to build strong teams, foster innovation, & drive student success.
Content provided by Follett Learning
School & District Management K-12 Essentials Forum Principals, Lead Stronger in the New School Year
Join this free virtual event for a deep dive on the skills and motivation you need to put your best foot forward in the new year.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: June 12, 2024
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: May 29, 2024
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: May 8, 2024
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: April 17, 2024
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read