Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Opinion
Education Opinion

Twitter Polls for Learning in and out of Class

By Starr Sackstein — September 15, 2016 1 min read

Could Twitter possibly get even better?

The short answer is yes.

The poll function has lots of great uses for the classroom. It’s super easy to use and is a great way to gather quick data.

To use, all you have to do is click the tweet button to compose a tweet (see photo), then click the poll icon on the bottom right, write your question and put two answers in. Then tweet it out to the world.

Once folks start answering questions, the poll is live for 24 hours and the data gathers directly on the tweet. (See photo below). You’ll know how many people answered total and what percentage of people answered which answers, but not tied to specific users.

Here are some ways I can see this tool being useful in the classroom:


  • Can easily be used as an exit ticket posted to a class hashtag to quickly gather data and save paper.

  • To poll the room during class anonymously to gather consensus

  • To ask quick questions to determine learning in and out of class

  • Have students pose questions to class as a way to gain interaction during their own presentations to gage learning

  • To gather data for stats when doing research for an article for the school paper

  • Use it during professional learning to get teachers more engaged in the lesson or lecture and be able to use the data right away to shift the course of action if necessary.

There’s a simplicity and directness to using a quick question poll with 1-4 answers.

In addition to gathering data from the poll, Twitter also offers users information about how many people saw the tweet and how many interactions it had in this easy to read function. (See below)

Why not give it a try in your classroom?

How have you used Twitter’s poll function in your class or personal learning? Please share

The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
The 4 Biggest Challenges of MTSS During Remote Learning: How Districts Are Adapting
Leaders share ways they have overcome the biggest obstacles of adapting a MTSS or RTI framework in a hybrid or remote learning environment.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Superintendent, Dublin Unified School District
Dublin, California (US)
Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates
Superintendent, Dublin Unified School District
Dublin, California (US)
Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES
Larkspur, California
Tamalpais Union High School District
Special Education Teachers
Lancaster, PA, US
Lancaster Lebanon IU 13

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read