Education

New State Law Targets Shortage of Teachers

By Linda Jacobson — July 26, 2005 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The following offers highlights of the recent legislative sessions. Precollegiate enrollment figures are based on fall 2004 data reported by state officials for public elementary and secondary schools. The figures for precollegiate education spending do not include federal flow-through funds, unless noted.

Hawaii

Gov. Linda Lingle

Republican
Senate:
20 Democrats
5 Republicans

House:
41 Democrats
9 Republicans

Enrollment:
182,000

In an effort to address a severe teacher shortage, the Hawaii legislature passed, and Gov. Linda Lingle signed, legislation that creates new measures for attracting students into the teaching profession, and providing them with support once they are hired.

A new “teacher cadet” program will work to identify future teachers while they are still in high school. The law also encourages the University of Hawaii to revise its admission policies to make it easier for entering freshmen to declare an education major.

The law also will institute a new teacher-induction program. In addition, the act expands options for earning a Hawaii teaching license, including establishing reciprocal arrangements for licenses from other states and accepting college degrees from related fields.

During this year’s session, lawmakers also voted to form a 20-member Early Childhood Education Task Force as part of the Republican governor’s plan to expand preschool. As part of the effort, the department of education for the single statewide district will be required by Oct. 1 to identify unused classrooms that could be used for early-childhood classes.

The fiscal 2006 state budget of $8.9 billion includes $1.7 billion in general funds for K-12 schools, a 17 percent increase over fiscal 2005.

During the session, a new contract was signed with the Hawaii State Teachers Association that raises salaries 11 percent over two years, bringing the average annual salary in the state from $47,000 to $53,000. The raise will cost $20.4 million this fiscal year and an additional $77.1 million in fiscal 2007.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
Future of the First Amendment:Exploring Trends in High School Students’ Views of Free Speech
Learn how educators are navigating student free speech issues and addressing controversial topics like gender and race in the classroom.
Content provided by The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: June 8, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: June 1, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: May 11, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read
Education Briefly Stated: April 27, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
9 min read