Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education Report Roundup

Large Cities See a Rise in Graduation Rates

By The Associated Press — April 28, 2009 1 min read

The high school dropout problem is getting better in some big cities where it’s most severe, a national study has found.

But the situation remains dismal: More than one in four students drops out of high school in the United States.

Still, Philadelphia, Tucson, Ariz., and Kansas City, Mo., made huge gains over the past decade, boosting graduation rates by 20 percentage points or more, the study found. In all, 13 cities saw double-digit improvement in their graduation rates, according to the study released last week by the Washington-based America’s Promise Alliance.

“The majority of these large cities are making improvements, and that’s something you wouldn’t necessarily get if you’ve been listening to this debate recently,” said Christopher B. Swanson, the director of the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, which prepared the report. Editorial Projects in Education, based in Bethesda, Md., also publishes Education Week.

Urban schools still have a long way to go, though, the study found. On average, only half the students graduate in the 50 biggest cities, the report says. And while most big cities are making gains, 19 have lost ground. Las Vegas saw its graduation rates plummet 23 percentage points to 44.5 percent. The graduation rate in Wichita, Kan., dropped 18 percentage points to 54.5 percent, and in Omaha, Neb., it dropped 15 percentage points to 50 percent.

The report measures progress from 1995 to 2005, the most recent year for which comprehensive data were available from the U.S. Department of Education.

See Also

Read more Report Roundups.

A version of this article appeared in the April 29, 2009 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
The 4 Biggest Challenges of MTSS During Remote Learning: How Districts Are Adapting
Leaders share ways they have overcome the biggest obstacles of adapting a MTSS or RTI framework in a hybrid or remote learning environment.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Human Resources Manager
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Elementary Teacher - Scholars Academy
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Special Education Teacher
Chicago, Illinois
JCFS Chicago
Communications Officer
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Hamilton County Department of Education

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read