Education

Grants

August 11, 2004 3 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

GRANTS AWARDED

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

New York Life Foundation Grant

The New York Life Foundation recently awarded the Partnership for After School Education a three-year $600,000 grant. The grant will be used to provide summer learning opportunities to low-income middle schoolchildren.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Fine Arts Grants

The Nation Education Association Foundation awarded 10 secondary fine arts teachers with $2,000 grants. The grants recognize teachers who develop learning programs for at-risk students. The winners are listed below alphabetically.

Joanne Arnold, West Middle School, Binghamton, NY; Melissa Chaney, East Lake Academy of Fina Arts, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Linda Cohen, Crawford High School, San Diego, Calif; Shae Factory, Okmulgee Middle School, Okmulgee, Okla.; William Hartenberger, Barbour Language Academy, Rockford, Ill.; Christine Patella, Thomas Hooker School, Bridgeport, Conn.; Sally Schendel, Sheridan School District #5, Sheridan, Mont.; Peggi Stevens, Brooklin School, Brooklin, Maine; Ellen Taylor, Oregon Trail Junior High, Olathe, Kan.; Christine Turner, Lincoln Center of the Arts, Milwaukee.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

Economic Education Grant

The U.S Department of Education recently awarded the National Literacy Council on Economic Education a $1.48 million grant.

The grant will be used to fund an initiative to improve economic and financial literacy for K-12 students.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

Applications are due Oct. 1 for the Best Buy Foundation’s Te@ch grants. Grants support schools that integrate technology into the school curriculum. Twelve hundred one-year grants of $2,500, supplied in the form of gift certificates, are available. Schools must be located within 25 miles of a Best Buy store and the gift cards may only be used to sustain or enhance existing educational programs. Teachers, schools, and school districts are eligible to apply.

Contact: BBF, PO Box 9448, Minneapolis, MN 55440-9448; Web site: www.bestbuy.com.

Applications are due any time for Products for Learning grants from Fujifilm, based in Valhalla, NY. Grants recognize K-12 teachers that use photography and digital technology in their lesson plans. Winners will receive one of the following pieces of equipment: a digital camera, 35mm camera, memory card, film, USB drive, or zip disk.

Contact: Adam Yates, FF, Valhalla, NY; (212) 741-5106; ext. 20; e-mail: adam_Yates@fujifilm.com; Web site: www.productsforlearning.com.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Applications are due August 13 for grants from the SBC Foundation, the philanthropic arm of SBC Communications, a communications company based in San Antonio. Grants support programs to improve student achievement through technology. One-year grants ranging from $2,500 to $25,000 are available. Nonprofit educational organizations are eligible to apply.

Contact: Submit applications to state contact. Web site: www.sbc.com/Common/files/doc/2004_regional_%20RFP.doc.

Applications are due Sept. 17 for American Music Education Initiative grants from the National Music Foundation, based in Orlando, Fla. The grants recognize teachers in all subjects who use American music in their lesson plans. Finalists will receive cash grants of $1,000 and semi-finalists will receive $500 cash grants.

Contact: Thomas Heany, NMF, 2457A S. Hiawassee Road, #244, Orlando, FL 32835; (800) USA-MUSIC; e-mail: tom@usamusic.org; Web site: www.usamusic.org.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

Applications are due August 30 for Research and Innovation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of special education and rehabilitative services.

Grants support programs that develop and research reading interventions for students with mental retardation. Eight grants of $600,000 are available.

Contact: Kristen Lauer, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W, Potomac Center Plaza, Washington, DC 20202-2550; (202) 245-7412; Web site: www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2004- 3/071304d.html.

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Using Integrated Analytics To Uncover Student Needs
Overwhelmed by data? Learn how an integrated approach to data analytics can help.

Content provided by Instructure
School & District Management Live Online Discussion Principal Overload: How to Manage Anxiety, Stress, and Tough Decisions
According to recent surveys, more than 40 percent of principals are considering leaving their jobs. With the pandemic, running a school building has become even more complicated, and principals' workloads continue to grow. f we

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education California Makes Ethnic Studies a High School Requirement
California is among the first in the nation to require students to take a course in ethnic studies to get a diploma starting in 2029-30.
4 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Democratic Assembly members, from left, James Ramos, Chris Holden Jose Medina, and Rudy Salas, Jr., right, huddle during an Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Medina's bill to make ethnic studies a high school requirement was signed into law by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)