Education

Grants

May 22, 2002 9 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A symbol (**) marks available grants that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.

GRANTS AWARDED

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

NEW AMERICAN SCHOOLS’ MIDDLE START

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Battle Creek, Mich.-based philanthropy arm of the cereal-maker Kellogg Co., recently awarded $3 million to New American Schools and its affiliate, the Education Entrepreneurs Fund. The grant will support NAS’s Middle Start program, which focuses on improvement in the middle grades.

New American Schools promotes comprehensive school reform models, such as Middle Start, that improve student achievement. The Education Entrepreneurs Fund supports the business activities of school improvement service providers.

The Kellogg Foundation grant will act as seed money for the Middle Start program, with the expectation that the EEF will help the program become self-sustaining by the end of the three-year grant.

ARTS EDUCATION GRANT

The GE Fund, the Fairfield, Conn.-based philanthropic arm of the General Electric Company, recently awarded $300,000 to the Arts Education Partnership, a coalition of arts, education, business, and government organizations that promotes the arts in learning and school improvement.

The grant will be used to create a guide for school administrators describing how to incorporate arts education into the curriculum in their schools to improve student performance. The manual will focus especially on bringing arts education to low-performing, high-poverty schools.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

SCIENCE TEACHING IN PHILADELPHIA

The National Science Foundation recently awarded $850,000 to the program “GK-12 and GeoKids: Bringing Place-Based Science to Urban Philadelphia Schools.”

The grant will be used to send graduate and advanced undergraduate science students from Saint Joseph’s Unversity, a Jesuit university in Philadelphia, into city schools to help teach science courses that emphasize hands-on, project-based learning.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time for small grants for programs that improve classroom teaching and learning of math, science, and technology for students in grades 7-12, sponsored by the Toshiba America Foundation. Public and private schools, local education agencies, and youth organizations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico may apply. Projects should provide direct benefits to students and include teacher-led, classroom- based experiences. Grants of up to $5,000 are offered monthly throughout the year. Contact: TAF, Program Office, 1251 Avenue of the Americas, 41st Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 588-0820; e-mail: foundation@tai.toshiba.com; Web site: www.toshiba.com/about/taf.html.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

EXPERIMENTAL GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

Applications are due June 3 for grants from the Venture Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support work by nonprofit organizations and educational institutions engaging children in nontraditional, hands-on programs in three areas: understanding cultures through their own heritage and preserving cultural diversity; learning and using geographic concepts and skills; and building the skills to make environmental decisions based on scientific knowledge, a geographic perspective, and a commitment to conservation. Grants from $50,000 to $200,000 are available. Contact: Venture Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/foundation.

GEOGRAPHY TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are due June 14 for grants from the Teacher Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support teachers’ work in the classroom, district, or community in four areas: exploring uses of new technologies, expanding students’ experiential-learning opportunities, providing professional development and mentoring, and engaging families and communities in education. Individual teachers or teacher teams are eligible. Grants from $500 to $5,000 are available. Contact: Teacher Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/foundation.

GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are due June 14 for grants from the Grosvenor Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support the work of educational institutions and nonprofit organizations in two areas: expanding learning opportunities for teachers and students via experiential learning, professional development, and teacher mentoring; and promoting global geographic literacy via student assessments and innovative teaching and learning practices. Grants from $50,000 to $70,000 are available. Contact: Grosvenor Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/foundation.

SPACE EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time. Space Education Initiatives provides funding for Internet-based, K-12 space education programs. The four programs sponsored nationwide are Moonlink, NEARlink, Marslink, and Orbital Laboratory. The availability of grant money varies by state. Educators may apply for funding through Space Explorers Inc. Contact: SEI, (800) 965-3763; Web sites: www.space-explorers.com/grantinfo; www.moonlink.com; near.space-explorers.com; www.marslink.com; www.orbitallaboratory.com.

TOLERANCE EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time. The Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination, offers grants of up to $2,000 to K- 12 teachers. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Applications should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 264-0286, ext. 374.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

READING FIRST GRANTS

Applications are due May 29 for grants from the Reading First program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support scientifically based reading programs that help all students read proficiently by 3rd grade. About 57 awards of unspecified amounts are available. Contact: Chris Doherty, Reading First Program Office, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 2W108, Washington, DC 20202-6201; (202) 401-4877; email: ReadingFirst@ed.gov.

** UNDERGROUND RAILROAD EDUCATION

Applications are due May 30 for grants from the Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program, sponsored by the office of postsecondary education. Grants support nonprofit organzations that research, display, interpret, and collect artifacts relating to the underground railroad. About four awards from $100,000 to $2 million are available. Contact: Jay Donahue, USDE, 8th Floor, 1990 K St. N.W., Washington, DC 20006-8544; (202) 502-7507; e-mail: Jay.Donahue@ed.gov.

** READING RESEARCH PROJECTS

Applications are due May 31 for grants from the Program of Research on Reading Comprehension, sponsored by the office of educational research and improvement. Grants support programs of research that expand scientific knowledge of reading comprehension and reading development. About 10 awards from $75,000 to $500,000 are available. Contact: Anne P. Sweet or Rita Foy Moss, USDE, 555 New Jersey Ave. N.W., Room 513, Washington, DC 20208-5573; (202) 219-0610; fax: (202) 219-2135; e-mail: PRRCinfo@ed.gov.

AMERICAN-HISTORY TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are due June 3 for grants from the Teaching American History Grant Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support professional-development programs for teachers that increase their knowledge and appreciation of traditional American history. About 200 awards from $350,000 to $1 million are available. Contact: Christine Miller, Teaching American History Grant Program, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20202-6200; (202) 260-8766; e-mail: teachingamericanhistory@ed.gov.

** ELEMENTARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Applications are due June 3 for grants from the Elementary School Foreign Language Incentive Program, sponsored by the office of English-language acquisition. Grants support programs to teach foreign languages to elementary students. About $6 million is available for an unspecified number of awards. Contact: Rebecca Richey, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 5617, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-6510; (202) 205-9717; e-mail: rebecca.richey@ed.gov.

** ENGLISH-LANGUAGE TEACHING

Applications are due June 6 for grants from the English Languge Acquisition: National Professional Development Program, sponsored by the office of English-language acquisition. Grants support professional-development programs for teachers of limited-English- proficient students, including certification or licensure programs for LEP teachers. About 150 grants of roughly $250,000 are available. Applicants west of the Mississippi river, contact: Brenda Compton-Turner, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 5090, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-6510; (202) 205- 9839; e-mail: Brenda.Turner@ed.gov; applicants east of the Mississippi river, contact: Mahal May, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 5090, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-6510; (202) 205-8727; e-mail: Mahal.May@ed.gov.

** PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Applications are due June 7 for grants from the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support in-school and after-school K- 12 physical education programs that help students reach state physical education standards. About 165 grants of roughly $300,000 are available. Contact: Ethel Jackson, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 3E308, Washington, DC 20202-6123; (202) 260-2812; e-mail: Ethel.Jackson@ed.gov.

** NATIVE-LANGUAGE SPEAKERS

Applications are due June 7 for grants from the Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program, sponsored by the office of English-language acquisition. Grants support language-instruction programs for limited-English-proficient students from Native American, Alaska native, native Hawaiian, and native American Pacific Islander descent that result in increases in English-language proficiency. About 26 awards from $100,000 to $225,000 are available. Contact: Samuel Lopez, OELA, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room MES 5605, Washington, DC 20202-6400; (202) 401-1427; e-mail: samuel.lopez@ed.gov.

** SAFE AND HEALTHY SCHOOLS PROGRAMS

Applications are due June 21 for grants from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative, sponsored by the Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Justice. Grants support communitywide programs that promote safe and drug-free schools and healthy children. About 40 awards of roughly $2 million are available. Contact: Kellie Dressler Tetrick, SS/HS Coordinator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, USDOJ, 810 7th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20531; (202) 514-4817; TDD: (888) 877-8339; e-mail: dresslek@ojp.usdoj.gov; Web site: www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org/grants/safeschools.html.

** TEACHER-QUALITY STATE GRANTS

Applications are due July 1 for grants from the Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants ProgramState Grants, sponsored by the office of postsecondary education. Grants support state efforts to improve the quality of new teachers. About 25 awards of up to $5 million are available. Contact: Brenda Shade, Teacher Quality Program, OPE, USDE, 1990 K St. N.W., Room 6152, Washington, DC 20006-8525; (202) 502-7878; fax: (202) 502-7699; e-mail: Brenda.Shade@ed.gov.

A version of this article appeared in the May 22, 2002 edition of Education Week


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Judge's Temporary Order Allows Iowa Schools to Mandate Masks
A federal judge ordered the state to immediately halt enforcement of a law that prevents school boards from ordering masks to be worn.
4 min read
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks to reporters following a news conference, Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, in West Des Moines, Iowa. Reynolds lashed out at President Joe Biden Thursday after he ordered his education secretary to explore possible legal action against states that have blocked school mask mandates and other public health measures meant to protect students against COVID-19. Reynolds, a Republican, has signed a bill into law that prohibits school officials from requiring masks, raising concerns as delta variant virus cases climb across the state and schools resume classes soon. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Education Hurricane Ida Deals New Blow to Louisiana Schools Struggling to Reopen
The opening of the school year offered teachers a chance to fully assess the pandemic's effects, only to have students forced out again.
8 min read
Six-year-old Mary-Louise Lacobon sits on a fallen tree beside the remnants of her family's home destroyed by Hurricane Ida, in Dulac, La., on Sept. 4, 2021. Louisiana students, who were back in class after a year and a half of COVID-19 disruptions kept many of them at home, are now missing school again after Hurricane Ida. A quarter-million public school students statewide have no school to report to, though top educators are promising a return is, at most, weeks away, not months.
Six-year-old Mary-Louise Lacobon sits on a fallen tree beside the remnants of her family's home destroyed by Hurricane Ida, in Dulac, La., on Sept. 4, 2021.
John Locher/AP
Education Massachusetts National Guard to Help With Busing Students to School
250 guard personnel will be available to serve as drivers of school transport vans, as districts nationwide struggle to hire enough drivers.
1 min read
Massachusetts National Guard soldiers help with logistics in this Friday, April 17, 2020 file photo, at a food distribution site outside City Hall, in Chelsea, Mass. Mass. Gov. Charlie Baker on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, activated the state's National Guard to help with busing students to school as districts across the country struggle to hire enough drivers.
Massachusetts National Guard soldiers help with logistics in this Friday, April 17, 2020 file photo, at a food distribution site outside City Hall, in Chelsea, Mass.
Michael Dwyer/AP
Education FDA: ‘Very, Very Hopeful’ COVID Shots Will Be Ready for Younger Kids This Year
Dr. Peter Marks said he is hopeful that COVID-19 vaccinations for 5- to 11-year-olds will be underway by year’s end. Maybe sooner.
4 min read
Dr. Peter Marks, director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a Senate health, education, labor, and pensions hearing to examine an update from federal officials on efforts to combat COVID-19 on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 11, 2021. On Friday, Sept. 10, 2021, Marks urged parents to be patient, saying the agency will rapidly evaluate vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds as soon as it gets the needed data.
Dr. Peter Marks, director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in the Food and Drug Administration, testifies during a Senate health, education, labor, and pensions hearing to examine an update from federal officials on efforts to combat COVID-19 on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 11, 2021.
Jim Lo Scalzo/AP