Education

Grants/Fellowships

May 01, 2002 7 min read
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Following are application deadlines for grants and fellowships available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

Open MATH AND SCIENCE
The Toshiba America Foundation awards grants for programs that improve classroom teaching and learning of math and science for K-12 students. U.S. public and private schools, as well as museums and nonprofits that work with schools, may apply. Projects should provide direct benefits to students and include teacher-led, classroom-based experiences. For grades 7-12, grants of up to $5,000 are offered monthly throughout the year; larger awards are given in March and September. K-6 grant applications are due by October 1. Contact: Toshiba America Foundation, Program Office, 1251 Avenue of the Americas, 41st Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 588-0820; fax (212) 588-0824; e- mail foundation@tai.toshiba.com; www. toshiba.com/html/taf.html.

Open MATH AND SCIENCE
MathSoft Engineering and Education Inc., an education software developer, offers Digital Age Math and Science Teaching Grants for educators and schools that would like to use its StudyWorks software and materials. Applicants submit proposals detailing how they would use StudyWorks in their 7th through 12th grade classrooms. Schools sponsoring winning teachers receive a lab grant for 25 seats of StudyWorks Mathematics or Science Deluxe and a stipend toward the cost of attending math, science, or technology conferences. The number of winners varies each year. For more information, contact: MathSoft Engineering & Education Inc., StudyWorks Grant Program, 101 Main St., Cambridge, MA 02142; fax (617) 577-8829; e-mail studyworks@mathsoft. com; www.studyworksonline.com.

Open TOLERANCE
Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. For more information, contact: Annie Bolling, Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 956-8381; www. teachingtolerance.org.

*May 15 TEACHER OF THE YEAR
Staff Development for Educators, a professional-development company, seeks nominations for its Teacher of the Year Awards. Certified K-3 teachers working in accredited U.S. or Canadian schools who demonstrate innovative teaching and a commitment to the profession are eligible. A winner from each grade receives $1,000, an expenses- paid trip to a four-day education conference in Orlando, Fla., and a commemorative plaque. Contact: Jane Quigley, National Program Planner, Staff Development for Educators, P.O. Box 577, Peterborough, NH 03458; (800) 924- 9621, ext. 325; e-mail jquigley@sde. com; www.sde.com.

May 25 MATERIALS SCIENCE
The ASM International Foundation, a society of metals and materials scientists, awards 10 grants of $500 each to K-12 teachers. Applicants submit two-page proposals describing curriculum-based, hands-on projects that enhance students’ awareness of the materials around them and involve observation, communication, and math and science skills. For more information, contact: Jeanne Deatherage, ASM International Foundation, 9639 Kinsman Rd., Materials Park, OH 44073-0002; (800) 336-5122, ext. 5133; e-mail jdeather@asminternational. org; www.asminternational.org.

May 30 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
The Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation invites graphic communications teachers to submit grant proposals for graphic communications education projects. Typical programs aim to train teachers, guidance counselors, and other faculty or to teach students about graphic arts technology, as well as expose them to career opportunities within the industry. Proposals submitted by May 30 are considered for full funding; proposals for grants of up to $2,500 are accepted on a rolling basis. For more information, contact: Eileen Cassidy, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, 1899 Preston White Dr., Reston, VA 20191-4367; (703) 264-7200; fax (703) 620-3165; e-mail gaerf@ npes.org.

June 15 LOW-INCOME SCHOOLS
Nike’s Jordan brand sponsors the Jordan Fundamentals Grant Program, which recognizes public school teachers or paraprofessionals working to inspire 6th through 12th graders at schools where at least 40 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. A committee of teachers chooses winners based on the uniqueness of projects or lesson plans submitted by applicants. Each year, up to 400 grants of $2,500 are available for resource materials, supplies, equipment, and transportation costs related to the project. For more information, contact: Jordan Fundamentals Grant Program, Scholarship Management Services, CSFA, 1505 Riverview Rd., P.O. Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082; (507) 931-1682; e-mail jordanfundamentals@ csfa.org; nikebiz.com/community/ jordan_fund.shtml.

June 30 REGIONAL STUDIES
The Orion Society, an award-winning publisher and environmental education organization, offers up to 10 Stories in the Land teaching fellowships to promote the study of local landscapes, histories, and literature. K-12 teachers in the United States and Canada are eligible for these yearlong $1,000 fellowships. Application materials include a project proposal outlining the curriculum and its objectives, a personal statement, a project budget, the applicant’s résumé, and a letter of support from the school’s chief administrator. Applications are available online. For more information, contact: Dale Abrams, Education Coordinator, Stories in the Land, Orion Society, 187 Main St., Great Barrington, MA 01230; (413) 528-4422; e-mail dabrams@orionsociety.org; www.oriononline.org/sil.

July 1 COMPUTERS
Wolfram Research Inc., makers of Mathematica, a technical computing software system, announces the High School Grant Program. Grants support K-12 teachers worldwide who use Mathematica to develop computer-based classroom materials. Recipients earn copies of Mathematica software for their schools, other course materials, and technical support. The number of grant recipients varies. Applications are available online. For more information, contact: Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr., Champaign, IL 61820; (800) WOLFRAM or (217) 398-0700; e-mail highschoolgrants@ wolfram.com; www.wolfram.com/ company/programs/hsgp.

July 15 JAPAN
The United States-Japan Foundation offers grants to improve U.S. K-12 instruction on Japan through professional development, intensive study tours in Japan, and curriculum design. The foundation funds new or existing programs that include some of the following components: leadership development, information on U.S.-Japan relations and contemporary issues in both countries, training on using international issues in the classroom, and multimedia teaching tools. Grants last for one year but may be renewed by the foundation, which also supports the improvement of Japanese language instruction through teacher training and curriculum development. Letters of inquiry must be received by July 15; full grant proposals are due August 31. For more information, contact: David Janes, Program Officer, Precollege Education Programs, United States-Japan Foundation, 145 E. 32nd St., 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016; (212) 481-8757; fax (212) 481-8762; e-mail djanes@us- jf. org; www.us-jf.org.

*August 1 METEOROLOGY
The National Weather Association annually awards three or more Sol Hirsch Education Fund Grants of $500 each to improve the quality of meteorology education. K-12 teachers may apply for individual scholarships to attend a course or professional conference, or they may request grant funds for equipment to enhance their students’ study of weather. Winners are announced in October at the NWA annual meeting in Fort Worth, Texas. For more information, contact: Kevin Lavin, Executive Director, National Weather Association, 1697 Capri Way, Charlottesville, VA 22911-3534; (434) 296-9966; e- mail natweaasoc@aol. com; www.nwas.org.

*September 14 MUSIC
The National Music Foundation announces the annual American Music Education Initiative to recognize K-12 teachers of any subject who use American music in their classrooms. Teachers submit lesson plans, which are judged on clarity of objectives, adaptability, effectiveness, and innovation. Three finalists receive grants of $1,000 each, and five semifinalists receive grants of $500 each. The foundation publishes the winners’ lesson plans on an online database. Application forms also are available on the Web. For more information, contact: Thomas Heany, Director of Programming, National Music Foundation, 2457A S. Hiawassee Rd., #244, Orlando, FL 32835; (800) USA-MUSIC; e-mail info@usamusic.org; www.usamusic.org.

—Rose Gordon


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