Education

Grants/Fellowships

March 01, 2001 9 min read
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Following are application deadlines for grants and fellowships available to individuals and schools. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

*Open TEACHING TOLERANCE

Grants of up to $2,000 are available to K-12 teachers from the Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education.

Requests should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 264-0286, ext. 374.

March 1 EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

The Foundation for Exceptional Children offers a grant to encourage innovative programs for gifted students or students with disabilities. Proposals for the $500 award must be for education-related projects designed to provide services to children with disabilities and/or gifted children, parents of disabled children, or unemployed disabled youths. Contact: Mini-Grant Committee, Foundation for Exceptional Children, 1110 N. Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA 22201; www.cec.sped.org.

March 15 CURRICULUM

Curriculum Associates, a publisher of educational materials, announces several grants for outstanding K-8 teachers. Grants are awarded for proposals that effectively make use of teaching tools such as technology and print. Three educators each receive $1,000 plus a $500 gift certificate for Curriculum Associates materials. Contact: Grant Program Committee Chair, Curriculum Associates Inc., 153 Rangeway Rd., P.O. Box 2001, North Billerica, MA 01862- 0901; (800) 225-0248; www. curriculumassociates.com.

March 15 GEOGRAPHY

The National Geographic Society Education Foundation offers approximately 30 grants of up to $1,250 each to support innovative geography education. Applicants must have graduated from summer geography institutes held by the National Geographic Society or a state geographic alliance. Grants are awarded based on whether proposed projects support the implementation of the national and state geography standards, involve teachers and students in hands-on work and field experiences, stimulate community awareness and participation, and encourage teachers’ professional development. For more information, contact: Christopher Shearer, Program Officer, National Geographic Society Education Foundation, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-4688; (202) 857-7000; www. nationalgeographic.com/foundation.

March 15 STANDARDS

The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, an extension of the National Education Association, announces its Innovation Grant program to promote educational endeavors leading to student achievement of high standards. The foundation annually awards up to 200 grants of $2,000 each to teams of two or more educators. Preference is given to applicants who serve economically disadvantaged and/or underserved students, as well as to members of the NEA. Grants may be used for resource materials, supplies, equipment, transportation, software, and professional fees. For more information, contact: National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, 1201 16th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3207; (202) 822-7840; e-mail lkothari@nea.org; www.nfie.org.

March 16 CABLE TELEVISION

C-SPAN, the cable-television network that covers Congress, seeks applicants for its Middle and High School Teacher Fellowship Program. The selected fellow works at C-SPAN in Washington, D.C., for four weeks in the summer to develop high school print, video, and online materials for the network. The fellow receives a $5,500 stipend, $500 in coupons for C-SPAN materials, and $500 for round-trip airfare and travel expenses. For more information, contact: C-SPAN Middle and High School Teacher Fellowship Program, C-SPAN, Education Relations, 400 N. Capitol St. N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 523- classroom.

March 21 GEOGRAPHY

The National Council for the Social Studies and the George F. Cram Company Inc. offer the Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy. Individuals as well as groups working in school districts, public institutions, or universities may submit a proposal for a program aimed at integrating the study of geography into social studies curricula. The winning individual or team receives $2,500, a commemorative gift, and national recognition. For more information, contact: Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy, National Council for the Social Studies, 3501 Newark St. N.W., Washington, DC 20016; (202) 966-7840; e- mail information@ncss.org; www.ncss.org/awards/home.html.

*April-May OPERA

The Metropolitan Opera Guild seeks applicants for Creating Original Opera, a seven-day summer program to help about 100 elementary and middle school teachers use opera and musical theater in their classrooms. Tuition, room, board, and supplies are paid by the program, but there is a registration fee. Deadlines vary by region. For more information, contact: Metropolitan Opera Guild, Education at the Met, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023; (212) 769-7028; www. operaed.org.

*April 1 LIBRARY SERVICE

The Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, offers financial assistance to those planning a career in children’s library service. Three $6,000 Bound To Stay Bound Books Scholarships and two $6,000 Frederic G. Melcher Scholarships are awarded. Applicants must have been accepted to, but not yet begun, course work toward a master’s or other advanced degree in library science. They must commit to work in the field for at least one year after graduation and also must join the ALA and the ALSC. For more information, contact: ALSC or the Office for Human Resources Development, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611- 2795; (312) 280-4281; www.ala.org/work/awards/scho lars.html.

*April 1 SECONDARY SCHOOLS

The Edward E. Ford Foundation annually awards grants to National Association of Independent Schools-member secondary schools in the United States and to NAIS- member state and regional associations. For more information, contact: Walter Burgin, Executive Director, Edward E. Ford Foundation, 1912 Sunderland Pl. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1608; (202) 955-1028; fax (202) 955-8097; www.eeford.org.

*April 1 TECHNOLOGY

EDS, a global services company, announces its Technology Grants program to help teachers of children ages 6 to 18 purchase information technology products and services that will further their pupils’ ability to learn. Eligible schools must be within a 50-mile radius of a sponsoring EDS office. To apply, teachers submit classroom projects or student exercises that improve curriculum objectives and become more effective through the use of technology. EDS awards over 100 technology grants, each worth $1,500, to schools worldwide. For more information, contact: Charlene Edwards, EDS Global Community Affairs; (972) 605- 6557; e-mail charlene.edwards@eds.com; www.eds.com/co mmunity_affairs/com_tech_grants.shtml.

*April 15 HUMANITIES

The National Endowment for the Humanities offers the Humanities Focus Grant, designed to support groups of educators working to improve teaching and learning in the humanities. The maximum award is $25,000 and covers the cost of travel, materials, and administration. Schools, colleges, museums, and other nonprofit organizations may apply. For more information, contact: Division of Education Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20506; (202) 606-8380; e-mail education@neh.gov; www.neh.gov.

*April 15 RURAL TEACHERS

The National Rural Education Association and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association announce the Mini-Grant program. Any K-12 rural teacher whose school is served by a Rural Electric Cooperative or whose students’ homes are served by a Rural Electric Cooperative is eligible. Ten grants of $300 are offered for classroom-based projects that feature student investigation of scientific energy or electricity. Projects must demonstrate student-teacher cooperation, student involvement, and coordination with local electrical cooperatives; they must also focus on student learning and adhere to other specified guidelines. For more information, contact: Rural Teacher Mini-Grants, NREA Headquarters, 246 Education Building, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1588; (970) 491-7022; e-mail jnewlin@lamar. colostate.edu.

*April 20 LANGUAGE

The Center for Applied Linguistics seeks applicants for its G. Richard Tucker Fellowship. From June 2001 through May 2002, including a four-week residency at the Center in Washington, D.C., the fellow works with senior CAL staff on one of the group’s ongoing research projects or on a suitable project suggested by the fellow. Priority is given to proposals that focus on language education and testing or on language issues related to minorities in the United States or Canada. The competition is open to master’s or doctoral candidates currently enrolled in a degree program in any field that is concerned with the study of language. Applicants must have completed the equivalent of at least one year of full-time graduate study. Minorities are especially encouraged to apply. The fellowship pays a $2,400 stipend plus travel expenses. For more information, contact: Grace Burkart, Center for Applied Linguistics, 4646 40th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20016; (202) 362-0700; e-mail grace@cal.org.

*May 15 FINE ARTS

The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, an arm of the National Education Association, announces its Fine Arts Grants, which enable teachers to create and implement fine arts programs that target students at risk of failing school. Ten grants of $2,000 each are awarded to local NEA affiliates who administer the project. Local affiliates choose a teacher of art, music, theater, dance, design, media, or folk arts who is an NEA member to implement the grant. Grants must serve U.S. public middle or high school students. For more information, contact: National Foundation for the Improvement of Education, 1201 16th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3207; (202) 822-7840; e-mail lkothari@nea.org; www.nfie.org.

*May 25 MATERIALS SCIENCE

The ASM International Foundation, a society of metals and materials scientists, awards 10 grants of $500 each to K-12 teachers. Applicants submit a two-page proposal describing curriculum-based, hands-on projects that enhance students’ awareness of the materials around them and involve observation, communication, and math and science skills. For more information, contact: ASM International Foundation, Living in a Material World Program, Materials Park, OH 44073-0002; (216) 433-3680; www.asminternational.org/found ation.

*May 30 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

The Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation invites graphic communications teachers to submit grant proposals for education projects in the graphic-communications field. Typical programs aim to train teachers, guidance counselors, and other faculty and/or teach students about graphic arts technology, as well as expose them to career opportunities within the industry. Proposals submitted by May 30 are considered for full funding; proposals for grants of up to $2,500 are accepted on a rolling basis. For more information, contact: Meredith Lamont, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, 1899 Preston White Dr., Reston, VA 20191-4367; (703) 264-7200; fax (703) 620-3165; e- mail gaerf@npes.org.

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